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Pellissippi State History

Pellissippi State Community College was founded in 1974 as State Technical Institute at Knoxville. In the years since its founding, the College’s name has changed twice: in 1988, to Pellissippi State Technical Community College and, in 2009, to Pellissippi State Community College.

When the College first opened its doors, it had 45 students studying three associate’s degree programs, all in engineering technology, under the tutelage of a dozen faculty and staff members. In the years since, Pellissippi State has experienced steady growth—from those first 45 students in 1974 to nearly 11,000 students, not counting non-credit, in fall 2013.

The College continues to support and develop career-path associate’s degrees, associate’s degrees for transfer to four-year institutions, certificates, and continuing education opportunities to meet the needs of the community. Pellissippi State offers credit courses to high school students as well.

Pellissippi State has five campuses in its Knox and Blount county service area: Hardin Valley, Division Street, Magnolia Avenue, Blount County and Strawberry Plains. As of fall 2013, the College employed more than 516 full-time faculty and staff and more than 409 part-time.

Pellissippi State’s economic impact on East Tennessee—measured by the value of business volume, jobs and individual income—is estimated at about $1.3 billion over the five-year period from 2008 to 2013. The College awarded 1,258 associate’s degrees in 2013, more than any other two-year college in the state, according to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission.

Through numerous partnerships with the community, Pellissippi State sustains the effort toward an ever-improving quality of life for residents of East Tennessee.

Pellissippi State Community College is one of 46 institutions in the Tennessee Board of Regents system, the sixth largest system of higher education in the nation. TBR is the governing board for this system, which includes six universities, 13 two-year colleges and 27 colleges of applied technology, providing programs in 90 of Tennessee’s 95 counties to more than 200,000 students.