Donn King
Economics: The Musical with protestors
Joan Easterly

Faculty Lecture Series

faculty lecture series graphic

Events like the Faculty Lecture Series provide our faculty members with a venue outside the classroom to share their passion and do what they do best: inspire, question, motivate, and teach. You don’t have to be a student to attend these free community lectures. Join us and be awakened to new ideas and possibilities by some of our remarkable faculty.

All faculty lectures take place in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus.



Claude Hardy:
A Journey Through Russian Theatre Design

Tuesday, September 20, 1 p.m.

Introduces Russian theatre and why their design means so much to the U.S., and to Claude.


Heidi Speck:
Sex, Lies and Hermaphrodites

Thursday, October 20, 12:30 p.m.

Reveals surprising truths about the nature of biological sex, including a look at the roles of chromosomes, hormones and anatomical characteristics in defining biological sex.


Trent Eades:
The History of Science Fiction

Thursday, November 10, 12:30 p.m.

Traces the development of science fiction from its earliest Greco-Roman beginnings to present day.


Frank Mashburn:
The Matter with Matter: Or, Why Reality is Stranger Than You Think

Wednesday, February 8, 2 p.m.

Analyzes — through idealist philosophy and the work of George Berkeley — what the world around us is made of, and how those facts turn out to be more complicated than most people think.


Claude Hardy:
Good God, Claude! Introduction to Black Gospel

Tuesday, February 21, 1 p.m.

Introduces black gospel music that is relatively unknown but worth a listen.


Carol Luther:
The Silliest Stuff You’ve Ever Heard: Love vs. Logic in ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’

Wednesday, March 1, 12 p.m.

Traces the development of science fiction from its earliest Greco-Roman beginnings to present day.


Grant Mincy:
The Ecology of Play: How Leisure Time Activities Benefit the Common Good

Wednesday, April 12, 2 p.m.

Analyzes the biological, cultural and societal implications of an American culture that places greater importance on work than on play. Explores the way play enhances social ties, develops the social brain and other, deeper brain functions.