‘Black Hawk Down’ author to speak at Pellissippi State

posted in: Community, Events | 0

male leaning against bar with arms foldedBestselling author Mark Bowden will be at Pellissippi State Community College Thursday, Sept. 18, for a lecture and book signing. He is the author of “Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War” and “The Finish: The Killing of Osama Bin Laden,” as well as an essayist in Pellissippi State’s 2014 Common Book, “The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2013.”

Bowden will visit classrooms during the day, then begin his public presentation at 7:30 p.m. in the Clayton Performing Arts Center of the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The book signing and a question-and-answer session follow the lecture.

The Common Book unites all Pellissippi State freshmen in a shared reading experience. The reading becomes the basis of a yearlong discussion of issues related to the book. The Common Book encourages exploration in class and in co-curricular programming and events both on and off campus.

“The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2013” will serve to inspire discussions on topics such as biology, nature, and the impact of scientific research on the world around us and in our own psyches.

Bowden’s essay, “The Measured Man,” recounts the work of Larry Smarr, an astrophysicist and pioneer of the Internet who advocates “digitally enabled genomic medicine” through in-depth study of his own body. Bowden relates Smarr’s self-diagnosis of Crohn’s disease, an incurable chronic inflammation disorder of the digestive system, and his intensive self-study of everything from his bodily excretions to his DNA. Smarr foresees a future in which health care is personalized and each person is in charge of his own treatments, but he faces criticism that such a future could lead to unnecessary medical intervention and anxiety.

Bowden’s presentation is sponsored by Pellissippi State’s English Department and the Pellissippi State Foundation. Funding is provided by the Foundation’s Clayton Performing Arts Endowment.

For more information about Bowden’s visit, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. For more information about the Pellissippi State Foundation, visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation or call (865) 694-6528.

Pellissippi State hosts Medic Mobile at Hardin Valley Campus

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Medic Regional Blood Center will host a blood drive at Pellissippi State Community College’s Hardin Valley Campus on Wednesday, July 9. The community is invited to donate.

The Medic Mobile is scheduled to be at the campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. The Medic Mobile will be in Faculty/Staff Parking Lot 2 near the Educational Resources Center.

Medic, a nonprofit organization, supplies 27 area hospitals with volunteer donations. Medic representatives say there is a need for all blood types.

Potential donors must be at least 17 years of age and weigh at least 110 pounds. Donors should not fast before arriving. Medic suggests that donors eat a meal and drink fluids approximately three hours prior to donating. Participants also are asked to present photo identification and a list of current medications.

For more questions about donor eligibility, visit www.medicblood.com. For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

The facts about Tennessee Promise

posted in: Academics, Community, Students | 0

Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise will bring significant changes to the state’s higher education landscape, so we’re taking this opportunity to address several common questions and misconceptions about the new initiative, specifically as it impacts Pellissippi State.

Tennessee Promise is part of the state’s Drive to 55 campaign, which aims to increase the percentage of Tennesseans with college degrees or certifications to 55 percent by the year 2025. Through Tennessee Promise, graduating high school seniors will be eligible to earn an associate’s degree or certificate free of tuition and fees.

For complete details on Tennessee Promise, visit www.driveto55.org/initiatives.

  • Who is eligible for Tennessee Promise? Any high school senior who graduates from an eligible Tennessee high school or home school program and anyone who completes a GED or HiSET diploma before 19 years of age can apply for funds. The program will launch with the high school graduating class of 2015. Tennessee Promise students who graduate from high school in spring 2015 must begin college in fall 2015 to receive funding.
  • What will students be required to do? To get Tennessee Promise funding, students must take the following steps in their senior year of high school:
      1. Apply for the Tennessee Promise program by November 1.
      2. Attend mandatory meetings related to completing the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) and applying to college.
      3. Complete the FAFSA by February 15.
      4. Attend New Student Orientation.
      5. Maintain continuous enrollment as a full-time student (12 credit hours), maintain a 2.0 GPA and complete at least eight hours of community service each term.
  • What does Tennessee Promise fund? Tennessee Promise is a last-dollar scholarship—that is, it will cover tuition and fees after other assistance (except for loans and work-study) has been applied. It won’t cover books or the cost of attendance fees, such as travel and gas expenses.
  • How will funds be administered? Tennessee Promise funds will be administered by the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation through higher education institutions. Students will never receive funding directly.

About 25,000 high school seniors are expected to apply to higher education institutions in fall 2015 through Tennessee Promise. The initiative is estimated to cost about $34 million per year, and the funds will come from existing sources, including modifications to the HOPE Scholarship.

Pellissippi State to dedicate Jenny and Randy Boyd Building

In recognition of outstanding support of higher education opportunities in this area, Pellissippi State Community College will dedicate its Strawberry Plains Campus building in honor of Randy and Jenny Boyd on Friday, May 9.

The dedication ceremony begins at 10 a.m., and the campus is located at 7201 Strawberry Plains Pike. Tours of the building will follow.

“We are naming this building in recognition of Jenny and Randy Boyd for their support of Pellissippi State Community College and their dedication to increased access and opportunities for higher education in East Tennessee,” said L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State’s president.

In 2012, Randy and Jenny Boyd donated $1 million to the Pellissippi State Foundation toward the purchase of the Strawberry Plains Campus. The campus began offering classes in fall of that year.

Boyd, who is chairman of Radio Systems Corporation, also was Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s special advisor for higher education in 2013. In 2009, he helped start tnAchieves, a last-dollar scholarship and mentoring program for college students.

Boyd is a proponent of the governor’s “Drive to 55” campaign. The campaign’s goal to increase the percentage of Tennesseans with college degrees or certificates to 55 percent by 2025.

For more information about Pellissippi State or its campuses, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

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