Category Archives: Division Street Campus

Pellissippi State hosts inaugural ‘Take Back the Night’

WHO: Pellissippi State Community College students and employees and community members are invited to “Take Back the Night” to raise awareness of domestic and sexual violence.Take Back the Night” is an international awareness campaign.

WHAT: Pellissippi State’s “Take Back the Night” event features a short march and a “speak out” session featuring keynote speaker Kali Meister, a Pellissippi State adjunct faculty member, playwright, and rape survivor. Also on hand will be college counselors as well as representatives of local women’s health and community outreach organizations.

WHEN AND WHERE: Thursday, Nov. 6, at 6 p.m. on the Division Street Campus, 3435 Division St.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State plans open houses at site campuses

Pellissippi State Community College will host open houses at each of its site campuses this month and next.

The events are free and open to all prospective students and their families.

“These open houses allow students to meet with Admissions and Financial Aid representatives,” said Leigh Anne Touzeau, assistant vice president of Enrollment Services, “as well as with other support services like Advising, Counseling Services, Student Life and Recreation, and some faculty.”

Open house locations and dates:

  • Division Street Campus: 5-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 26
  • Magnolia Avenue Campus: 4-7 p.m. Thursday, March 27
  • Blount County Campus: 4:30-6 p.m. Thursday, April 3
  • Strawberry Plains Campus: 5-7 p.m. Tuesday, April 8

Each open house is a drop-in event. Anyone who is interested may attend to learn more about Pellissippi State’s academic options, how to apply for financial aid and to the college, and the many resources available to students.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State campuses host free Black History Month events

Pellissippi State Community College is celebrating Black History Month with numerous events at its five campuses throughout February. Activities are free and the community is invited.

The Magnolia Avenue Campus starts the month-long activities with “Healthy Pelli: Campus Health Fair,” Wednesday, Feb. 5. Each Friday in February, the site hosts an African Jazz Cafe in the Lobby.

The Division Street Campus offers two films in February: Disney’s “Ruby Bridges” on the 11th and “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” on the 20th. Both are at 12:15 p.m. in the Student Lounge.

The Magnolia Avenue Campus hosts a “History of African-American Music: Freedom Songs, Blues and Jazz” 10:45 a.m.-Noon Wednesday, Feb. 12, in the Community Room. The presentation features local jazz artist Kelle Jolly.

The Blount County Campus presents the documentary “The Underground Railroad” Tuesday, Feb. 18, in the Educational Resources Center.

At the Hardin Valley Campus, Feb. 21 brings “A Celebration of African-American Art, Music and Literature.” The event is in the Goins Building College Center, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. It features an art display, performance by the Vine Middle School African Dancers and Drummers, poetry reading by Oak Ridge poet Rose Weaver, and “Taste of Soul Food.”

Also at the Hardin Valley site, Feb. 27 the community is invited to a Faculty Lecture Series presentation: “John Brown: Maniacal Egotist or Moral Crusader?” by Joy Ingram, an associate professor. The talk is at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium.

Throughout the month, African-American history exhibits will be on display in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus, the Lobby of the Strawberry Plains Campus, the Student Lounge of the Division Street Campus, and the Educational Resources centers of the Blount County and Hardin Valley campuses.

The theme of the display at the Magnolia Avenue Campus is “All About That Jazz”; Division Street, “Embrace African-American Heritage Board of Fame”; and Strawberry Plains, “African-Americans of Influence.”

Other ongoing events include African tea and coffee tastings:

  • Hardin Valley, Goins Building Rotunda, 8:30-10 a.m. Wednesdays
  • Division Street, Student Lounge, 9-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays
  • Strawberry Plains, Lobby, 9-10:30 a.m. Mondays

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State recognizes veterans during Civic Engagement Week

Pellissippi State Community College is placing special emphasis on veteran fellowship and veteran strength with a planned Civic Engagement Week Sept. 10-17.

“Civic Engagement Week is about promoting a culture of altruism among our students. This year, the focus of Civic Engagement Week will be on veterans and their families,” said Cat Carr, AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer for Pellissippi State’s Service-Learning program.

“With nearly 100,000 troops home from Iraq and another 30,000 expected home from Afghanistan in the next year, it is crucial that communities understand the reintegration obstacles that veterans and military families face.”

On Pellissippi State’s Hardin Valley Campus, the week opens with “The Things We Carry: What War Does,” featuring guest speaker L. Caesar Stair III, a Vietnam veteran. The presentation is free and open to the public. It takes place in the Goins Building College Center 12:30-1:15 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10.

On Wednesday, Sept. 11, Pellissippi State faculty, staff and students pause for a moment of silence beginning at 9:03 a.m., as they remember the events of Sept. 11, 2001. Following the activity, guest speaker Clyde Luttrell, also a Vietnam veteran, delivers a brief address in the Courtyard.

Residents of the Ben Atchley State Veterans’ Home are on campus 10-11 a.m. Friday, Sept. 13, in the Courtyard for a meet-and-greet. Therapy dogs from HABIT (Human-Animal Bond in Tennessee) also will be on hand.

Pellissippi State’s Service-Learning students join others participating in Knoxville Stand Down for Homeless Veterans on Saturday, Sept. 14, at the National Guard Armory, 3300 Sutherland Ave. The special community service event, part of a nationwide support movement, provides area homeless veterans with clothing and other services.

Pellissippi State replays a recent “Dialogue” WUOT radio talk show broadcast that features Rachael Cragle, the college’s director of Advising, among others, in a segment dedicated to supporting veterans in East Tennessee. The replay is at 12:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Cafeteria Annex, Monday, Sept. 16.

Civic Engagement Week on the Hardin Valley Campus wraps up Tuesday, Sept. 17, with a special Constitution Day observance featuring Ron Bridges. Bridges, an associate professor in Natural and Behavioral Sciences at Pellissippi State, talks of veterans’ sacrifices as they uphold the U.S. Constitution. The presentation is 12:30-1:15 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

The Blount County Campus observes the National Day of Service and Remembrance at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11, by the campus’ flagpoles. The event recognizes veterans and their service and includes an introduction to Service-Learning.

The Division Street Campus kicks off the week on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 10-11 a.m. in the Student Lounge, by providing students with the opportunity to learn more about volunteerism and electoral participation.

The campus marks the National Day of Service and Remembrance at 8-9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11, in the Student Lounge. Students can attend “Protecting Our Financial Future” at 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. in Room 118. “Celebrate Our Veterans” is 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16, and Constitution Day is observed all day Tuesday, Sept. 17. Both events are in the Student Lounge.

The Magnolia Avenue Campus hosts its third annual Call to Service Volunteer Resource Fair 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11. The event introduces students and faculty to 35 agencies with community service opportunities and volunteer programs. The campus also hosts SunTrust Bank for a Finances 101 workshop Tuesday, Sept. 10. Three sessions are available: 9:10 a.m., 12:25 p.m. and 2 p.m. Topics include debt-free living, money management, retirement, investments and emergency preparedness, among others.

Students at the Strawberry Plains Campus have an opportunity to serve as part of a cleanup crew for the East Tennessee State Veterans Cemetery the week before Veterans Day (Nov. 11). They can sign up for the service project during Civic Engagement Week as well as throughout fall semester.

For more information about Civic Engagement Week events, contact Pellissippi State’s Service-Learning program at (865) 694-6492 or visit service-learning@pstcc.edu. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State schedules spring-semester New Student Orientation sessions

Want to attend Pellissippi State Community College during the spring 2013 semester? Make plans now to attend a New Student Orientation session.

The sessions are required of all first-time degree-seeking freshmen. Orientation is recommended for transfer students and those who have been out of school for a while.

The sessions give new enrollees the opportunity to meet with Pellissippi State students, faculty, and staff; learn strategies for college success; explore degree, major, and transfer options; and discover campus services and resources such as financial aid. Pellissippi State encourages parents, spouses and others supportive of the student to attend as well.

A total of 10 sessions, two at each campus, are offered. Accepted students are urged to reserve their place in an orientation session as soon as possible. Dates, times and locations are as follows:

Tuesday, Dec. 4, 5:30-8:30 p.m.—Hardin Valley Campus

Thursday, Jan. 10, 5:30-8:30 p.m.—Magnolia Avenue Campus

Friday, Jan. 11, 9-11:30 a.m.—Magnolia Avenue Campus

Monday, Jan. 14, 1-3 p.m.—Blount County Campus

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.—Division Street Campus

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2-4 p.m.—Strawberry Plains Campus

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 5:30-7:30 p.m.—Blount County Campus

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 9-noon—Hardin Valley Campus

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2-5 p.m.—Division Street Campus

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 5:30-7:30 p.m.—Strawberry Plains Campus

Pellissippi State’s spring 2013 application deadline is Jan. 7. Classes begin on Jan. 17.

Visit www.pstcc.edu/admissions/orientation or call (865) 694-6400 to make your reservation. To request accommodations for a disability, email accommodations@pstcc.edu or call (865) 539-7153.

Pellissippi State: Engineering Technology students enhance campus with service-learning project

Esther Dyer, dean of Pellissippi State’s Division Street Campus, views the new display case frame created by students Ted Maitlen and Ben Manuel (not pictured). Maitlen and Manuel created the frame to hold fliers at the campus. The frame was part of a project for both an Engineering Technology class and the college’s Service-Learning program.

Service-learning gives Pellissippi State Community College students an opportunity to learn while improving the community. In some cases, that means improving Pellissippi State’s campuses, too.

Just ask Ted Maitlen and Ben Manuel, two students in Engineering Technology’s Mechanical Engineering concentration who spent summer semester creating metal frames to display fliers at the Division Street Campus.

The college’s Service-Learning program integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.

“It’s more than I asked for—way more,” said Esther Dyer, dean of the Division Street Campus, after viewing the frame’s prototype in the Mechanical Engineering lab. “Your design will be in big demand,” she told the students. “It’s beautiful.”

The display frame is roughly a yard square, made of aluminum and designed to hold up to eight fliers. Plexiglas covers the front and holds the papers in place. For Maitlen and Manuel, the project differs from previous MET coursework in at least two ways.

First, there were no specifications at the outset.

“This is different because we had no prints provided for us,” said Maitlen, a 28-year-old U.S. Army veteran. “This is something we had to envision and draw out.”

He and Manuel also crafted a metal replica of the Pellissippi State shield as a centerpiece to the frame.

Second, they had a client.

As they designed and created the frames, they involved Dyer throughout the process. They also had a manager to answer to: Pat Riddle, MET faculty member and program coordinator. Riddle met with Dyer initially and proposed the project for Service-Learning.

“What they’ve done exactly mimics what they would have to do in industry to produce a product—all the way from conception to final installation of the product,” he said.

The project required the students to draw on everything they have learned at Pellissippi State, from MET classes to English, math and science. That is typical in Service-Learning.

“It’s about how to take all these—what seem to be disparate things that you’ve learned—and how to integrate those, so that you have the skills and knowledge it takes to actually perform at a level of expectation, not just in a school but within an organization,” Riddle said.

The first display frame is one of five in production for the Division Street Campus. Dyer, who took over at the campus in the spring, came up with the idea when she noticed fliers hanging in the hallways. Putting the fliers in displays makes them more visible and helps “accentuate” their message, she says.

As part of the MET capstone, the students will document the project so that someone else can either recreate it or use it as a basis for development of another product.

Pellissippi State launched its Service-Learning initiative last fall with workshops for interested faculty. The college began offering service-learning-based classes spring semester.

Students worked with several community partners this year, but that work does not always have to take place outside of campus, as Maitlen and Manuel have shown.

“It’s a great example of how Service-Learning can bring together administration, faculty and students in a situation where everyone benefits,” said Annie Gray, English faculty member and Service-Learning coordinator. “In other words, our community partner can be the college just as easily as it can be a nonprofit outside the college.”

Learn more about Pellissippi State at www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Film festival returns to Pellissippi State with screenings at all five campuses

With theater screenings at all five Knox and Blount county campuses of Pellissippi State Community College, East Tennessee film enthusiasts will have a myriad of viewing options during the upcoming seventh annual Southern Appalachian Film Festival.

Scheduled for Nov. 12-17, SOAPIFF promotes and preserves the work of independent filmmakers. It also encourages film production and film culture in Southern Appalachia.

The six-day festival is sponsored by the Tennessee Consortium for International Studies. TnCIS (www.tncis.org) is located on the Hardin Valley Campus of Pellissippi State. The Hardin Valley Campus is in Knox County, as are the Division Street, Magnolia Avenue and Strawberry Plains campuses. The Blount County Campus is the fifth of the college’s locations.

SOAPIFF features full-length and short films in the following genres: Appalachian, art/experimental, children’s, cultural minorities, documentary, environmental, foreign/international, gender/women’s, gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender, independent and young filmmakers.

As part of this year’s festival, SOAPIFF welcomes film industry veteran Adam Leipzig to Pellissippi State. Leipzig, who has served as a Disney executive and as director of National Geographic Films, has brought more than 25 movies to the screen. A reception in his honor takes place on Nov. 12 at 6:45 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus.

The director of one of the documentaries being screened also makes an appearance. Documentarian Nancy Ghertner, who directed “After I Pick the Fruit,” visits the Hardin Valley Campus on Nov. 13. The screening of her film begins at 7:55 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium.

SOAPIFF also brings to Knoxville a well-known international artist, Lori Zimmerman. Zimmerman presents and discusses current trends in fiber art on Nov. 13 at noon in the gallery of the Bagwell Center for Media and Art on the Hardin Valley Campus.

A complete schedule of SOAPIFF screenings and activities can be found at www.soapiff.com.

For more about Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Register to vote at Pellissippi State

Are you registered to vote in November’s state and federal elections? If not, Pellissippi State Community College is making it easier and more convenient by offering voter registration at all five campuses Sept. 11-14. The activities are part of the college’s first-ever Civic Engagement Week.

At the Hardin Valley Campus, voter registration takes place in the Courtyard between the Goins and McWherter buildings and inside the Alexander and McWherter buildings. Registration is scheduled for the following dates and times:

  • Sept. 11, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
  • Sept. 12, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
  • Sept. 13, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
  • Sept.14, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Also, on Sept. 25 the Knox County/Knoxville League of Women Voters will be on hand 10 a.m-1 p.m. to help with register voters. Weather permitting, the table will be set up in the Courtyard. If it rains, the table will be in the Goins Building Rotunda.

On Sept. 12-13 the Blount County Election Commission will have staff available at the Blount County Campus to answer questions and register voters. The event takes place 11 a.m.-1 p.m. in the Lobby.

The Division Street Campus will have registration forms available in Room 117 12:30-3 p.m. Sept. 13 and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sept. 14. On Sept. 25 the Knox County/Knoxville League of Women Voters will be set up 10 a.m-1 p.m. in Room 117.

At the Magnolia Avenue Campus, voter registration will be facilitated by Iota Phi Lambda business sorority Sept. 17. The event is 10-noon in the Lobby. Again, on Sept. 25 the Knox County/Knoxville League of Women Voters will be on hand for voter registration 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the Lobby.

At the Strawberry Plains Campus, registration takes place Sept. 11-14, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., in the Lobby.

According to the Knox County Election Commission, to be eligible to vote in Tennessee, voters must be a U.S. citizen, a resident of Tennessee and at least 18 years old on or before the next election. They may not have been convicted of a felony. If they have, their full rights of citizenship must have been restored or they must have received a pardon. As of Jan. 1, 2012, voters must present an acceptable photo ID at the polls.

For more information, call Pellissippi State at (865) 649-6400 or email faculty sponsors Annie Gray (ajgray@pstcc.edu) or Ann Kronk (aekronk@pstcc.edu).

Pellissippi State names head of Division Street Campus

Esther Dyer has been chosen to be the new assistant dean of the Division Street Campus of Pellissippi State Community College.

“She brings experience to the position in both education and business,” said Pellissippi State President Anthony Wise. “We are fortunate to have someone of her caliber to lead the Division Street Campus.”

Dyer was most recently the associate dean of Knoxville’s ITT Technical Institute. A native of Morgan County, she earned a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Tennessee and a master’s in organization development from Central Washington University.

Her experience as an educator includes teaching at virtually every academic level, elementary through college, as well as managing day-to-day operations in a postsecondary school setting. From the business perspective, she has significant experience in process improvement facilitation, conflict resolution, management coaching, strategic planning and team skills training.

Dyer says she looks forward to working with the employees of the Division Street Campus.

“I find the faculty and staff at Division Street to be family- and team-oriented and, specifically, focused on caring for and supporting the students in their various endeavors,” she said. “I want to be an integral part of maintaining that learning atmosphere and contributing to the ongoing growth at the campus.”

The Division Street Campus was home to 1,700 students fall 2011 semester. Pellissippi State also has four other campuses: Hardin Valley, Blount County, Magnolia Avenue and Strawberry Plains.

Learn more about Pellissippi State by visiting www.pstcc.edu or calling (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State instructor helps students overcome fear of public speaking

When it came time to present her speech, Meaghan Marsh sang.

The Pellissippi State Community College student belted out the first line of “O Canada,” the national anthem of Canada, and that was enough to get her started.

In Larry Dearing’s public speaking class on Wednesday night at the college’s Blount County Campus, the speeches ran the gamut: travel, addiction, work, disease, health-care precautions, the dangers of texting while driving. Like Marsh’s humorous musical opener, the other students’ props and approaches were unique and creative.

Dearing, who has taught public speaking at Pellissippi State for more than a decade, sat in the back of the room listening, making notes. During the day, the adjunct faculty member works full time off campus, and four nights a week, he teaches public speaking for Pellissippi State.

That schedule can make for a long day, but when Dearing sets foot in the classroom, he gets a second wind.

“When I get in class, I’m energized. All that tiredness goes away,” he said. “The day job is work—the night job is not.”

One of the reasons Dearing likes teaching in the evening, he says, is the mix of students: Students returning to college to finish a degree after several years’ hiatus from the classroom. Younger students and adults who juggle jobs, family and school. Career changers who work at jobs in which they see little hope for advancement or growth.

Returning to school after a hiatus can be a struggle. And public speaking can be especially daunting. That was something Dearing and the class addressed early in the semester.

“When we first started, we each talked about how this class was going to be for us, or how hard it was going to be for each one of us, because a lot of people have a problem with public speaking,” said Marsh, a Pellissippi State freshman and 2010 Alcoa High School graduate who wants to teach art.

Dearing has had students step in front of the class for the first speech and grow so nervous that they shake and turn red. Sometimes they apologize for the way they sound. He remembers his first public speaking class at the University of Tennessee, where he earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in theater and speech.

“I see me up there the first time and recall how hard it was for me,” he said.

Dearing started teaching public speaking initially in 1978, in the evenings at the Division Street Campus. He taught part time for three years and then embarked on a career in business. Twenty years later, he was still thinking about the classroom.

Ten years ago, Dearing started again in the place he originally taught: Division Street. He returned as an adjunct faculty member, and it all seemed as familiar as his first teaching experience at Pellissippi State.

“You know, Thomas Wolfe was wrong,” said Dearing. “You can go home again.”

With the semester nearly halfway over, his students seemed to have overcome many of their initial fears and appeared relaxed on Wednesday night. Marsh opened with the song and made the transition into her speech about work. She is not shy, but beginning with the song helped her get over the first hurdle.

“Yes, it was kind of like breaking the ice,” said Marsh. “Also, [Mr. Dearing] tells us that we need to have an introduction that draws people in, so I always try to start with something that makes people pay attention.”