Category Archives: Faculty Lecture Series

‘Who Are You (Really)?’ topic of Pellissippi State faculty lecture

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The community is invited to join in a philosophical discussion Nov. 12 at Pellissippi State Community College focusing on the essence of “you.” The presentation is part of the 2014-2015 Faculty Lecture Series.

Frank Mashburn, an assistant professor of philosophy at Pellissippi State, presents “Who Are You (Really)? Some Insights From Philosophy and Film” at 2 p.m. The free event is in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

cartoon of male holding a frame that says bonafide philosopher“The theme is, what is it that makes you ‘you’?” Mashburn said. “Some people think what makes you ‘you’ is the matter you are made of—and if that matter changes too much, you will cease to be ‘you.’ Some people think that what makes you ‘you’ has to do with your organic brain or your collection of memories. For others, your soul is what essentially makes you ‘you.’

“I will discuss these positions and show some powerful clips from films that showcase these important philosophical positions.”

The topic might seem mundane, but, he says, determining who you are, and what makes you who you are, is one of the most important questions anyone can consider.

“After all, you are ‘you’ every single day. When we attempt to answer that question, we can find ourselves wonder-struck: this life that might have seemed so boring could actually be complex and wondrous.”

“Who Are You (Really)?” is one of the events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the series commemorates the college’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: ‘Many Faces of Socrates’ topic of faculty lecture

portrait of male in suitEthics, logic, physics, politics, science. Western civilization owes a great debt to the classical Greek philosophers, and one Pellissippi State Community College faculty member pays his respects to one of those early sages in a lecture Thursday, Oct. 23.

Trent Eades, an assistant professor of English, presents “The Many Faces of Socrates” beginning at 12:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The lecture is free and the community is invited.
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“Socrates was one of the most influential people in history—not as a man who lays down laws, but as one who reasons,” Eades said. “He was credited with turning philosophy away from explanations of the world to exploration of the self—to ethics, morality, justice and the proper way for a person to live.”

Eades’ presentation, which includes cameo appearances by other Pellissippi State faculty members, focuses on Socrates as a multifaceted character. Born circa 470 BCE, the Athenian philosopher was the mentor to both Plato and Xenophon. His namesake “Socratic method”—based on asking and answering questions to provoke critical thinking—laid the foundation for Western systems of logic and philosophy.
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“The Many Faces of Socrates” is one of the events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the arts series celebrates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.
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For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Faculty lecture explores Mary Poppins, Maleficent approaches to teaching

headshot of female“Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, in a most delightful way!”

Unlike the heroine of the 1964 movie, Pellissippi State Community College’s Anne Pharr doesn’t blow into her classroom with an umbrella, but in her early years of teaching English, the assistant professor says she did make use of what she now calls the “Mary Poppins model” to engage students.

Pharr addresses the effectiveness of different teaching styles in an upcoming lecture at the college, “From Mary Poppins to Maleficent: Professorial Persona and Student Perception.” The event is at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 25, in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.
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“In an attempt to engage my students,” said Pharr, who has been teaching for two decades, “I added a spoonful of sugar to any task that might seem the least bit medicinal (or unpleasant) to my students. After a few years, I began to wonder if this approach to student engagement—putting all the responsibility on the teacher—set students up for long-term success.

“No one wants to be viewed as a Maleficent. But in my lecture, I hope faculty and students can consider this possibility: if an educator’s goal is to truly engage students, not merely entertain them, then temporary discomfort may well be worth it.”

The presentation by Pharr, the first of the 2014-15 Faculty Lecture Series, is free and open to the community.
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The Faculty Lecture Series is one of the many events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. Throughout the next year, the Arts series commemorates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about The Arts at Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Indie wrestling topic of March 26 Faculty Lecture Series talk

Portrait of a man with a mustache in navy blue suit with a yellow tieTurn reality on its head.

That’s the goal of John E. May, a photographer and Pellissippi State Community College faculty member, when he takes on the topic of independent wrestling at a Faculty Lecture Series talk Wednesday, March 26.

May’s lecture, “Indie Wrestling: Fabricating Reality,” begins at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the college’s Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The lecture is free and the community is invited.

“I’ve been photographing indie wrestling for about six years now. I’m fascinated by the spectacle of the event,” said May, an assistant professor in the Photography concentration of the Media Technologies program.

“When I tell people about photographing indie wrestling, normally what I hear is ‘It’s fake.’ Indie wrestling is a constructed reality, but so are movies and reality TV and fiction. During this lecture, we’re going to discuss constructed reality and turn it on its head.”

May plans to discuss the history of wrestling and take lecture attendees behind the scenes of an indie wrestling match. The independent wrestling circuit is made up of the smaller professional events as opposed to the major televised promotions.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “Indie Wrestling: Fabricating Reality” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Abolitionist John Brown topic of Feb. 27 talk

Joy-IngramJoy Ingram, an associate history professor at Pellissippi State Community College, delivers a presentation about white Civil War abolitionist John Brown Thursday, Feb. 27.

Part of the college’s Faculty Lecture Series, Ingram’s presentation, “John Brown: Maniacal Egoist or Moral Crusader?” begins at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

The event is free. The community is invited.

“The South was used to slave rebellions,” said Ingram, “but Brown’s uprising was the first time a person from the North had come to the South and committed acts of violence to try to free the slaves. Some historians say he sparked the Civil War.

“He’s been labeled crazy, a martyr, a religious zealot, a hero. I’m not going to try to put a label on him—I’ll leave that to the audience. But I will try to see what sets him apart from other abolitionists, what made him unique and what the end result of his actions was.”

Brown believed armed insurrection was the only way to end slavery in America. He and his followers instigated a number of conflicts in the South, culminating in an unsuccessful raid that he led on a federal armory in Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Brown was captured there and charged with treason, then hanged.

“Brown did not accomplish his plan to end slavery before his death,” said Ingram, “but his ideals lived on. The Harpers Ferry raid in 1859 escalated tension that eventually led to Southern secession and the Civil War.” The war began in 1861 and ended in 1865.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “John Brown” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State campuses host free Black History Month events

Pellissippi State Community College is celebrating Black History Month with numerous events at its five campuses throughout February. Activities are free and the community is invited.

The Magnolia Avenue Campus starts the month-long activities with “Healthy Pelli: Campus Health Fair,” Wednesday, Feb. 5. Each Friday in February, the site hosts an African Jazz Cafe in the Lobby.

The Division Street Campus offers two films in February: Disney’s “Ruby Bridges” on the 11th and “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” on the 20th. Both are at 12:15 p.m. in the Student Lounge.

The Magnolia Avenue Campus hosts a “History of African-American Music: Freedom Songs, Blues and Jazz” 10:45 a.m.-Noon Wednesday, Feb. 12, in the Community Room. The presentation features local jazz artist Kelle Jolly.

The Blount County Campus presents the documentary “The Underground Railroad” Tuesday, Feb. 18, in the Educational Resources Center.

At the Hardin Valley Campus, Feb. 21 brings “A Celebration of African-American Art, Music and Literature.” The event is in the Goins Building College Center, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. It features an art display, performance by the Vine Middle School African Dancers and Drummers, poetry reading by Oak Ridge poet Rose Weaver, and “Taste of Soul Food.”

Also at the Hardin Valley site, Feb. 27 the community is invited to a Faculty Lecture Series presentation: “John Brown: Maniacal Egotist or Moral Crusader?” by Joy Ingram, an associate professor. The talk is at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium.

Throughout the month, African-American history exhibits will be on display in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus, the Lobby of the Strawberry Plains Campus, the Student Lounge of the Division Street Campus, and the Educational Resources centers of the Blount County and Hardin Valley campuses.

The theme of the display at the Magnolia Avenue Campus is “All About That Jazz”; Division Street, “Embrace African-American Heritage Board of Fame”; and Strawberry Plains, “African-Americans of Influence.”

Other ongoing events include African tea and coffee tastings:

  • Hardin Valley, Goins Building Rotunda, 8:30-10 a.m. Wednesdays
  • Division Street, Student Lounge, 9-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays
  • Strawberry Plains, Lobby, 9-10:30 a.m. Mondays

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Poet Dunbar topic of Feb. 6 Faculty Lecture Series talk

portrait of a male in black hat and gray sweatshirtThe enduring poetry of African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar will be the topic of two Faculty Lecture Series presentations at Pellissippi State Community College in February.

Robert Boyd presents “A Salute to Dunbar,” reading selections from “The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar,” on Thursday, Feb. 6, and Thursday, Feb. 20.

“Dunbar was a ‘griot’ [an African tribal storyteller] who told his tales in verse,” said Boyd, an associate professor of English. “Words, rhythms, rhymes and voices became verse, verse that flowed from his imagination and his life on to those of us who read.”

The Feb. 6 presentation is at 12:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium of the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The Feb. 20 presentation takes place at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus, 1610 E. Magnolia Ave.

Both events are free. The community is invited.

Boyd’s presentations will include a discussion of Dunbar’s life and selected readings from his works.

Dunbar was an African-American poet, novelist and playwright of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Born in Ohio to parents who had been slaves in Kentucky, he was one of the first black writers to establish a national reputation.

“He wanted to be known for his more traditional poetry, but most of his better-known works are written in dialect,” Boyd said.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “A Salute to Dunbar” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

The Arts at Pellissippi State: Spring events range from art exhibits to theatre productions

More chances to enjoy dance, song, culture, art and theatre abound this spring as the 2013-2014 Arts at Pellissippi State, a series of events celebrating arts and culture, continues. Many of the presentations are free, and all are open to the public.

Participation in the arts does not mean just creation or performance by the artists. It can mean something a bit different to each individual who studies an exhibit, listens to a vocalist or discusses a film with friends.

Pellissippi State Community College invites members of the community to find their own ways to participate in The Arts at Pellissippi State’s array of activities.

Kicking off the new year is the “Art Histories” exhibit, featuring the works of S. L. Dickey and Tom Wegrzynowski. The exhibit runs Jan. 16-Feb. 6 at the gallery in the Bagwell Center on Pellissippi State’s Hardin Valley Campus. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Monday-Friday.

Other visual arts events include an exhibit of the art of Raymond Padrón in February, the Pellissippi State Frame-by-Frame Student Media Competition in March and the annual Student Art Show in April.

In recognition of Black History Month, Pellissippi State presents the Celebration of African-American Art, Music and Literature, Feb. 28, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The event takes place in the Goins Building College Center on the Hardin Valley Campus.

The college hosts the Seventh Annual Festival of Cultures 4:30-8:30 p.m., April 11, also in the Goins Building. This multicultural celebration allows attendees to sample foods and dance to music from a diverse selection of nations.

Theatre productions, both in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus, include “Freedom Circus” Feb. 21-23 and “Unnecessary Farce” April 4-6 and 11-13. Admission to “Freedom Circus” is free. Tickets to “Unnecessary Farce” are available at www.pstcc.edu/tickets.

Musical performances include the Winter Choral Concert on Feb. 25, the Student Honors Recital on March 6, the popular Jazz and Bluegrass Concert on March 27, the Instrumental Concert on April 24, and the Spring Choral Concert on May 1.

Rounding out the spring Arts at Pellissippi State calendar are three Faculty Lecture Series events—two in February and one in March—presented by Pellissippi State faculty members Robert Boyd, Joy Ingram and John May. Lecture topics include poet Laurence Dunbar, abolitionist John Brown and indie wrestling.

For more information about a particular event in The Arts at Pellissippi State, or for a full listing of the spring events, dates and times, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts.

Pellissippi State: Fairy tales topic of Nov. 6 Faculty Lecture Series talk

Trolls and mermaids, elves and giants. Why do fairy tales remain so enduring and endearing to adults? What basic truths do the stories teach?

These are the questions to be discussed at Pellissippi State’s next Faculty Lecture Series presentation, one of many offerings in The Arts at Pellissippi State’s yearlong slate of events. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

Marilyn Sue Yamin, an associate professor and the program coordinator of Composition in the English Department, delivers the lecture “Fairy Tales Aren’t Just for Children” at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov 6. The free event, which takes place in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, is open to the public.

“I’ll start with the origin and background of fairy tales,” said Yamin, “and discuss some of the critical and psychological theories that have been advanced about why fairy tales are so persistent—not just in American culture but all over the world—and why they remain so popular with adults.

“What is it about fairy tales that intrigues us, that keeps these stories prevalent in our lives, in the media, as movies and plays and television shows? We use fairy tales in all forms, past childhood.”

Part of the enduring popularity of fairy tales may be linked to their relevance to humanity.

“There is a basic truth in these tales that rings true through all cultures and keeps them forever young,” she said.

In her lecture, Yamin also will discuss the unique art form of fairy tales: how they can be adapted, transformed and rewritten, yet still remain true to the core of their story. She’ll discuss familiar fairy tales and characters, as well as read a short 20th century fairy tale that might be new to the audience.

To learn more about “Fairy Tales” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

The Arts at Pellissippi State kicks off fall events

Pellissippi State Community College launches a new year of dance, song, culture, art and theatre with the 2013-2014 Arts at Pellissippi State, and the public is invited to take part.

“Participation in the arts isn’t only for the artists,” said Pat Myers, director of community outreach and donor engagement. “Participation engages the audience as well, and it means something a little bit different to each person who studies an exhibit, listens to a vocalist or discusses a film with friends.”

The college encourages the community to participate in The Arts at Pellissippi State’s array of cultural activities. All events are free unless otherwise noted.

New to The Arts at Pellissippi State this year is the Pacific Rim Street Fest: A Celebration of Asian Pacific Rim Heritage, featuring the distinctive food, music, art and dance of the Asian Pacific Rim nations. The event is set for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4, in the Goins Building College Center on the Hardin Valley Campus.

Musical performances kick off with the annual Faculty Recital, featuring a showcase of talented Pellissippi State faculty members, at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3. All musical performances are in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus. Additional performances:

  • Fall Choral Concert, featuring student soloists and the student groups Concert Chorale and Variations Ensemble, 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24
  • Instrumental Concert, 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7
  • Holiday Spectacular, the perennially popular holiday event, with two shows, 6 and 8 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 5

Theatre productions begin with “The Robber Bridegroom,” Broadway’s hit bluegrass musical. Shows take place at 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 1-2 and 8-9 and 2 p.m. on Nov. 3 and 10, all in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus.

“Junie B. Jones in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells,” a fun adaptation of Barbara Park’s Junie. B. Jones books, is a co-production with The WordPlayers. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13, and 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14, in the Clayton Performing Arts Center. Purchase tickets for theatre productions at www.pstcc.edu/tickets.

Pellissippi State’s Faculty Lecture Series features daytime lectures by the college’s faculty on topics as varied as literature, historical figures and current events. All lectures take place in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus. Fall lectures:

  • “What They Know: Privacy in the Age of Digital Tracking” by Lisa Bogaty at 12:30 p.m. Oct. 3
  • “Fairy Tales Aren’t Just for Children” by Sue Yamin at 2 p.m. Nov. 6

The Bagwell Gallery on the Hardin Valley Campus shares the Foothills Craft Guild Basket Show through Oct. 15, featuring basket artistry by local and regional artisans. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.

The Arts at Pellissippi State continues with events throughout the winter and spring. Highlights of spring 2014 include the Seventh Annual Festival of Cultures, an art exhibit featuring sculptor Raymond Padrón and the modern theatre production “Unnecessary Farce.”

For more information about a specific event in The Arts at Pellissippi State or for a full listing of the year’s events, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu. Requests should be made at least two weeks in advance.