Coal in Appalachia topic of April 7 Pellissippi State faculty lecture

The community is invited to take part in a discussion of the history and possible future of coal in Appalachia on Tuesday, April 7, at Pellissippi State Community College’s next Faculty Lecture Series presentation.

Grant Mincy, an adjunct faculty member in Natural and Behavioral Sciences at Pellissippi State, presents “Flowers of Darkness: Coal, Power and Liberty in the Southern Appalachian Bio-Region” beginning at 12:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium at the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

The event is free and the community is invited.

“The presentation will include a brief history of the Appalachians and coal formation, the rise of the coal industry and its consequences and evolution over the years, and the social movements in the region that might liberate the coal fields from industry,” said Mincy, who teaches biology and geology.

“As an environmental scientist, I think coal mining—especially mountaintop removal and valley fill operations—is incredibly destructive. I’m also concerned with the human cost of coal mining and the ensuing socioeconomic depression.”

Mincy has participated in a number of protests against the coal mining industry, including an event staged by the Occupy movement at the U.S. Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C., and a march with Appalachia Rising.

“Flowers of Darkness: Coal, Power and Liberty in the Southern Appalachian Bio-Region” is part of the Faculty Lecture Series. The lecture series presentations are among the many events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the arts series commemorates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Liberty, freedom of speech topics of ‘Je suis Charlie’ lecture at Pellissippi State

Portrait of a female with glasses and hallway behind her

“Je suis Charlie” was the slogan that emerged in response to the attack on the French newspaper Charlie Hebdo in early January. The French phrase translates as “I am Charlie,” and it came to stand for liberty, human rights, and freedom of speech.

“Je suis Charlie” is the topic of a faculty lecture at Pellissippi State Community College on Thursday, March 19. The event takes place on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road, beginning at 10:45 a.m. It is free and open to the community.

“I was in Paris three days after the peaceful march in response to the attack at Charlie Hebdo,” said Saralee Peccolo-Taylor, who is presenting the lecture. “The presentation will include my personal testimony from being in Paris at that time, as well as photos from Paris and interviews with French citizens.”

The lecture not only covers the attack but also includes a discussion of the history of liberty and of human rights in France and an homage to the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists and journalists who were killed.

“I really want attendees to think about the nature of liberty, the nature of freedom of speech and the importance of peaceful responses to attacks on liberty,” Peccolo-Taylor said.

Peccolo-Taylor has taught at local high schools and colleges for 40 years. She has taught French as an adjunct faculty member at Pellissippi State for four years. A first-generation American citizen, Peccolo-Taylor is passionate about travel and also works as a consultant for the American Council for International Studies. During her tenure as an educator, she has led students on 35 study abroad trips.

“Je suis Charlie” is a presentation of the college’s Faculty Lecture Series. The lecture series is part of the collection of events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the arts series commemorates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about the college and The Arts at Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

African-American modern art topic of Pellissippi State faculty lecture

male smiling, standing in front of brick hallway

Herb Rieth, a faculty member at Pellissippi State Community College, presents a lecture titled “Flip, Flop and Freestylin’: Art of the African Diaspora in the 20th and 21st Century” at the college at 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 12.

The event is free and open to the community. The lecture takes place in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

“I’m going to be talking about the history of African-American modern art,” said Rieth, an assistant professor in Liberal Arts, “especially from the 1960s Civil Rights Movement and onward.”

His presentation will feature discussions of the works and lives of artists Kara Walker; Willie Cole; Yinka Shonibare, MBE (Most Excellent Order of the British Empire); and Kahinde Wiley.

Rieth’s presentation is just one event in the Faculty Lecture Series. The lecture series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the arts series celebrates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about The Arts at Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

‘Who Are You (Really)?’ topic of Pellissippi State faculty lecture

portrait of male with fall landscape behind him

The community is invited to join in a philosophical discussion Nov. 12 at Pellissippi State Community College focusing on the essence of “you.” The presentation is part of the 2014-2015 Faculty Lecture Series.

Frank Mashburn, an assistant professor of philosophy at Pellissippi State, presents “Who Are You (Really)? Some Insights From Philosophy and Film” at 2 p.m. The free event is in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

cartoon of male holding a frame that says bonafide philosopher“The theme is, what is it that makes you ‘you’?” Mashburn said. “Some people think what makes you ‘you’ is the matter you are made of—and if that matter changes too much, you will cease to be ‘you.’ Some people think that what makes you ‘you’ has to do with your organic brain or your collection of memories. For others, your soul is what essentially makes you ‘you.’

“I will discuss these positions and show some powerful clips from films that showcase these important philosophical positions.”

The topic might seem mundane, but, he says, determining who you are, and what makes you who you are, is one of the most important questions anyone can consider.

“After all, you are ‘you’ every single day. When we attempt to answer that question, we can find ourselves wonder-struck: this life that might have seemed so boring could actually be complex and wondrous.”

“Who Are You (Really)?” is one of the events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the series commemorates the college’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

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