Category Archives: Faculty Lecture Series

Coal in Appalachia topic of April 7 Pellissippi State faculty lecture

The community is invited to take part in a discussion of the history and possible future of coal in Appalachia on Tuesday, April 7, at Pellissippi State Community College’s next Faculty Lecture Series presentation.

Grant Mincy, an adjunct faculty member in Natural and Behavioral Sciences at Pellissippi State, presents “Flowers of Darkness: Coal, Power and Liberty in the Southern Appalachian Bio-Region” beginning at 12:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium at the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

The event is free and the community is invited.

“The presentation will include a brief history of the Appalachians and coal formation, the rise of the coal industry and its consequences and evolution over the years, and the social movements in the region that might liberate the coal fields from industry,” said Mincy, who teaches biology and geology.

“As an environmental scientist, I think coal mining—especially mountaintop removal and valley fill operations—is incredibly destructive. I’m also concerned with the human cost of coal mining and the ensuing socioeconomic depression.”

Mincy has participated in a number of protests against the coal mining industry, including an event staged by the Occupy movement at the U.S. Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C., and a march with Appalachia Rising.

“Flowers of Darkness: Coal, Power and Liberty in the Southern Appalachian Bio-Region” is part of the Faculty Lecture Series. The lecture series presentations are among the many events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the arts series commemorates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Liberty, freedom of speech topics of ‘Je suis Charlie’ lecture at Pellissippi State

Portrait of a female with glasses and hallway behind her

“Je suis Charlie” was the slogan that emerged in response to the attack on the French newspaper Charlie Hebdo in early January. The French phrase translates as “I am Charlie,” and it came to stand for liberty, human rights, and freedom of speech.

“Je suis Charlie” is the topic of a faculty lecture at Pellissippi State Community College on Thursday, March 19. The event takes place on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road, beginning at 10:45 a.m. It is free and open to the community.

“I was in Paris three days after the peaceful march in response to the attack at Charlie Hebdo,” said Saralee Peccolo-Taylor, who is presenting the lecture. “The presentation will include my personal testimony from being in Paris at that time, as well as photos from Paris and interviews with French citizens.”

The lecture not only covers the attack but also includes a discussion of the history of liberty and of human rights in France and an homage to the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists and journalists who were killed.

“I really want attendees to think about the nature of liberty, the nature of freedom of speech and the importance of peaceful responses to attacks on liberty,” Peccolo-Taylor said.

Peccolo-Taylor has taught at local high schools and colleges for 40 years. She has taught French as an adjunct faculty member at Pellissippi State for four years. A first-generation American citizen, Peccolo-Taylor is passionate about travel and also works as a consultant for the American Council for International Studies. During her tenure as an educator, she has led students on 35 study abroad trips.

“Je suis Charlie” is a presentation of the college’s Faculty Lecture Series. The lecture series is part of the collection of events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the arts series commemorates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about the college and The Arts at Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

African-American modern art topic of Pellissippi State faculty lecture

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Herb Rieth, a faculty member at Pellissippi State Community College, presents a lecture titled “Flip, Flop and Freestylin’: Art of the African Diaspora in the 20th and 21st Century” at the college at 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 12.

The event is free and open to the community. The lecture takes place in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

“I’m going to be talking about the history of African-American modern art,” said Rieth, an assistant professor in Liberal Arts, “especially from the 1960s Civil Rights Movement and onward.”

His presentation will feature discussions of the works and lives of artists Kara Walker; Willie Cole; Yinka Shonibare, MBE (Most Excellent Order of the British Empire); and Kahinde Wiley.

Rieth’s presentation is just one event in the Faculty Lecture Series. The lecture series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the arts series celebrates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about The Arts at Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

‘Who Are You (Really)?’ topic of Pellissippi State faculty lecture

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The community is invited to join in a philosophical discussion Nov. 12 at Pellissippi State Community College focusing on the essence of “you.” The presentation is part of the 2014-2015 Faculty Lecture Series.

Frank Mashburn, an assistant professor of philosophy at Pellissippi State, presents “Who Are You (Really)? Some Insights From Philosophy and Film” at 2 p.m. The free event is in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

cartoon of male holding a frame that says bonafide philosopher“The theme is, what is it that makes you ‘you’?” Mashburn said. “Some people think what makes you ‘you’ is the matter you are made of—and if that matter changes too much, you will cease to be ‘you.’ Some people think that what makes you ‘you’ has to do with your organic brain or your collection of memories. For others, your soul is what essentially makes you ‘you.’

“I will discuss these positions and show some powerful clips from films that showcase these important philosophical positions.”

The topic might seem mundane, but, he says, determining who you are, and what makes you who you are, is one of the most important questions anyone can consider.

“After all, you are ‘you’ every single day. When we attempt to answer that question, we can find ourselves wonder-struck: this life that might have seemed so boring could actually be complex and wondrous.”

“Who Are You (Really)?” is one of the events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the series commemorates the college’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: ‘Many Faces of Socrates’ topic of faculty lecture

portrait of male in suitEthics, logic, physics, politics, science. Western civilization owes a great debt to the classical Greek philosophers, and one Pellissippi State Community College faculty member pays his respects to one of those early sages in a lecture Thursday, Oct. 23.

Trent Eades, an assistant professor of English, presents “The Many Faces of Socrates” beginning at 12:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The lecture is free and the community is invited.
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“Socrates was one of the most influential people in history—not as a man who lays down laws, but as one who reasons,” Eades said. “He was credited with turning philosophy away from explanations of the world to exploration of the self—to ethics, morality, justice and the proper way for a person to live.”

Eades’ presentation, which includes cameo appearances by other Pellissippi State faculty members, focuses on Socrates as a multifaceted character. Born circa 470 BCE, the Athenian philosopher was the mentor to both Plato and Xenophon. His namesake “Socratic method”—based on asking and answering questions to provoke critical thinking—laid the foundation for Western systems of logic and philosophy.
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“The Many Faces of Socrates” is one of the events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the arts series celebrates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.
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For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Faculty lecture explores Mary Poppins, Maleficent approaches to teaching

headshot of female“Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, in a most delightful way!”

Unlike the heroine of the 1964 movie, Pellissippi State Community College’s Anne Pharr doesn’t blow into her classroom with an umbrella, but in her early years of teaching English, the assistant professor says she did make use of what she now calls the “Mary Poppins model” to engage students.

Pharr addresses the effectiveness of different teaching styles in an upcoming lecture at the college, “From Mary Poppins to Maleficent: Professorial Persona and Student Perception.” The event is at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 25, in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.
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“In an attempt to engage my students,” said Pharr, who has been teaching for two decades, “I added a spoonful of sugar to any task that might seem the least bit medicinal (or unpleasant) to my students. After a few years, I began to wonder if this approach to student engagement—putting all the responsibility on the teacher—set students up for long-term success.

“No one wants to be viewed as a Maleficent. But in my lecture, I hope faculty and students can consider this possibility: if an educator’s goal is to truly engage students, not merely entertain them, then temporary discomfort may well be worth it.”

The presentation by Pharr, the first of the 2014-15 Faculty Lecture Series, is free and open to the community.
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The Faculty Lecture Series is one of the many events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. Throughout the next year, the Arts series commemorates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about The Arts at Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Indie wrestling topic of March 26 Faculty Lecture Series talk

Portrait of a man with a mustache in navy blue suit with a yellow tieTurn reality on its head.

That’s the goal of John E. May, a photographer and Pellissippi State Community College faculty member, when he takes on the topic of independent wrestling at a Faculty Lecture Series talk Wednesday, March 26.

May’s lecture, “Indie Wrestling: Fabricating Reality,” begins at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the college’s Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The lecture is free and the community is invited.

“I’ve been photographing indie wrestling for about six years now. I’m fascinated by the spectacle of the event,” said May, an assistant professor in the Photography concentration of the Media Technologies program.

“When I tell people about photographing indie wrestling, normally what I hear is ‘It’s fake.’ Indie wrestling is a constructed reality, but so are movies and reality TV and fiction. During this lecture, we’re going to discuss constructed reality and turn it on its head.”

May plans to discuss the history of wrestling and take lecture attendees behind the scenes of an indie wrestling match. The independent wrestling circuit is made up of the smaller professional events as opposed to the major televised promotions.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “Indie Wrestling: Fabricating Reality” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Abolitionist John Brown topic of Feb. 27 talk

Joy-IngramJoy Ingram, an associate history professor at Pellissippi State Community College, delivers a presentation about white Civil War abolitionist John Brown Thursday, Feb. 27.

Part of the college’s Faculty Lecture Series, Ingram’s presentation, “John Brown: Maniacal Egoist or Moral Crusader?” begins at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

The event is free. The community is invited.

“The South was used to slave rebellions,” said Ingram, “but Brown’s uprising was the first time a person from the North had come to the South and committed acts of violence to try to free the slaves. Some historians say he sparked the Civil War.

“He’s been labeled crazy, a martyr, a religious zealot, a hero. I’m not going to try to put a label on him—I’ll leave that to the audience. But I will try to see what sets him apart from other abolitionists, what made him unique and what the end result of his actions was.”

Brown believed armed insurrection was the only way to end slavery in America. He and his followers instigated a number of conflicts in the South, culminating in an unsuccessful raid that he led on a federal armory in Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Brown was captured there and charged with treason, then hanged.

“Brown did not accomplish his plan to end slavery before his death,” said Ingram, “but his ideals lived on. The Harpers Ferry raid in 1859 escalated tension that eventually led to Southern secession and the Civil War.” The war began in 1861 and ended in 1865.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “John Brown” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State campuses host free Black History Month events

Pellissippi State Community College is celebrating Black History Month with numerous events at its five campuses throughout February. Activities are free and the community is invited.

The Magnolia Avenue Campus starts the month-long activities with “Healthy Pelli: Campus Health Fair,” Wednesday, Feb. 5. Each Friday in February, the site hosts an African Jazz Cafe in the Lobby.

The Division Street Campus offers two films in February: Disney’s “Ruby Bridges” on the 11th and “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” on the 20th. Both are at 12:15 p.m. in the Student Lounge.

The Magnolia Avenue Campus hosts a “History of African-American Music: Freedom Songs, Blues and Jazz” 10:45 a.m.-Noon Wednesday, Feb. 12, in the Community Room. The presentation features local jazz artist Kelle Jolly.

The Blount County Campus presents the documentary “The Underground Railroad” Tuesday, Feb. 18, in the Educational Resources Center.

At the Hardin Valley Campus, Feb. 21 brings “A Celebration of African-American Art, Music and Literature.” The event is in the Goins Building College Center, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. It features an art display, performance by the Vine Middle School African Dancers and Drummers, poetry reading by Oak Ridge poet Rose Weaver, and “Taste of Soul Food.”

Also at the Hardin Valley site, Feb. 27 the community is invited to a Faculty Lecture Series presentation: “John Brown: Maniacal Egotist or Moral Crusader?” by Joy Ingram, an associate professor. The talk is at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium.

Throughout the month, African-American history exhibits will be on display in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus, the Lobby of the Strawberry Plains Campus, the Student Lounge of the Division Street Campus, and the Educational Resources centers of the Blount County and Hardin Valley campuses.

The theme of the display at the Magnolia Avenue Campus is “All About That Jazz”; Division Street, “Embrace African-American Heritage Board of Fame”; and Strawberry Plains, “African-Americans of Influence.”

Other ongoing events include African tea and coffee tastings:

  • Hardin Valley, Goins Building Rotunda, 8:30-10 a.m. Wednesdays
  • Division Street, Student Lounge, 9-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays
  • Strawberry Plains, Lobby, 9-10:30 a.m. Mondays

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Poet Dunbar topic of Feb. 6 Faculty Lecture Series talk

portrait of a male in black hat and gray sweatshirtThe enduring poetry of African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar will be the topic of two Faculty Lecture Series presentations at Pellissippi State Community College in February.

Robert Boyd presents “A Salute to Dunbar,” reading selections from “The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar,” on Thursday, Feb. 6, and Thursday, Feb. 20.

“Dunbar was a ‘griot’ [an African tribal storyteller] who told his tales in verse,” said Boyd, an associate professor of English. “Words, rhythms, rhymes and voices became verse, verse that flowed from his imagination and his life on to those of us who read.”

The Feb. 6 presentation is at 12:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium of the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The Feb. 20 presentation takes place at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus, 1610 E. Magnolia Ave.

Both events are free. The community is invited.

Boyd’s presentations will include a discussion of Dunbar’s life and selected readings from his works.

Dunbar was an African-American poet, novelist and playwright of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Born in Ohio to parents who had been slaves in Kentucky, he was one of the first black writers to establish a national reputation.

“He wanted to be known for his more traditional poetry, but most of his better-known works are written in dialect,” Boyd said.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “A Salute to Dunbar” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.