Category Archives: Faculty Lecture Series

The Arts at Pellissippi State: Spring events range from art exhibits to theatre productions

More chances to enjoy dance, song, culture, art and theatre abound this spring as the 2013-2014 Arts at Pellissippi State, a series of events celebrating arts and culture, continues. Many of the presentations are free, and all are open to the public.

Participation in the arts does not mean just creation or performance by the artists. It can mean something a bit different to each individual who studies an exhibit, listens to a vocalist or discusses a film with friends.

Pellissippi State Community College invites members of the community to find their own ways to participate in The Arts at Pellissippi State’s array of activities.

Kicking off the new year is the “Art Histories” exhibit, featuring the works of S. L. Dickey and Tom Wegrzynowski. The exhibit runs Jan. 16-Feb. 6 at the gallery in the Bagwell Center on Pellissippi State’s Hardin Valley Campus. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Monday-Friday.

Other visual arts events include an exhibit of the art of Raymond Padrón in February, the Pellissippi State Frame-by-Frame Student Media Competition in March and the annual Student Art Show in April.

In recognition of Black History Month, Pellissippi State presents the Celebration of African-American Art, Music and Literature, Feb. 28, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The event takes place in the Goins Building College Center on the Hardin Valley Campus.

The college hosts the Seventh Annual Festival of Cultures 4:30-8:30 p.m., April 11, also in the Goins Building. This multicultural celebration allows attendees to sample foods and dance to music from a diverse selection of nations.

Theatre productions, both in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus, include “Freedom Circus” Feb. 21-23 and “Unnecessary Farce” April 4-6 and 11-13. Admission to “Freedom Circus” is free. Tickets to “Unnecessary Farce” are available at www.pstcc.edu/tickets.

Musical performances include the Winter Choral Concert on Feb. 25, the Student Honors Recital on March 6, the popular Jazz and Bluegrass Concert on March 27, the Instrumental Concert on April 24, and the Spring Choral Concert on May 1.

Rounding out the spring Arts at Pellissippi State calendar are three Faculty Lecture Series events—two in February and one in March—presented by Pellissippi State faculty members Robert Boyd, Joy Ingram and John May. Lecture topics include poet Laurence Dunbar, abolitionist John Brown and indie wrestling.

For more information about a particular event in The Arts at Pellissippi State, or for a full listing of the spring events, dates and times, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts.

Pellissippi State: Fairy tales topic of Nov. 6 Faculty Lecture Series talk

Trolls and mermaids, elves and giants. Why do fairy tales remain so enduring and endearing to adults? What basic truths do the stories teach?

These are the questions to be discussed at Pellissippi State’s next Faculty Lecture Series presentation, one of many offerings in The Arts at Pellissippi State’s yearlong slate of events. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

Marilyn Sue Yamin, an associate professor and the program coordinator of Composition in the English Department, delivers the lecture “Fairy Tales Aren’t Just for Children” at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov 6. The free event, which takes place in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, is open to the public.

“I’ll start with the origin and background of fairy tales,” said Yamin, “and discuss some of the critical and psychological theories that have been advanced about why fairy tales are so persistent—not just in American culture but all over the world—and why they remain so popular with adults.

“What is it about fairy tales that intrigues us, that keeps these stories prevalent in our lives, in the media, as movies and plays and television shows? We use fairy tales in all forms, past childhood.”

Part of the enduring popularity of fairy tales may be linked to their relevance to humanity.

“There is a basic truth in these tales that rings true through all cultures and keeps them forever young,” she said.

In her lecture, Yamin also will discuss the unique art form of fairy tales: how they can be adapted, transformed and rewritten, yet still remain true to the core of their story. She’ll discuss familiar fairy tales and characters, as well as read a short 20th century fairy tale that might be new to the audience.

To learn more about “Fairy Tales” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

The Arts at Pellissippi State kicks off fall events

Pellissippi State Community College launches a new year of dance, song, culture, art and theatre with the 2013-2014 Arts at Pellissippi State, and the public is invited to take part.

“Participation in the arts isn’t only for the artists,” said Pat Myers, director of community outreach and donor engagement. “Participation engages the audience as well, and it means something a little bit different to each person who studies an exhibit, listens to a vocalist or discusses a film with friends.”

The college encourages the community to participate in The Arts at Pellissippi State’s array of cultural activities. All events are free unless otherwise noted.

New to The Arts at Pellissippi State this year is the Pacific Rim Street Fest: A Celebration of Asian Pacific Rim Heritage, featuring the distinctive food, music, art and dance of the Asian Pacific Rim nations. The event is set for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4, in the Goins Building College Center on the Hardin Valley Campus.

Musical performances kick off with the annual Faculty Recital, featuring a showcase of talented Pellissippi State faculty members, at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3. All musical performances are in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus. Additional performances:

  • Fall Choral Concert, featuring student soloists and the student groups Concert Chorale and Variations Ensemble, 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24
  • Instrumental Concert, 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7
  • Holiday Spectacular, the perennially popular holiday event, with two shows, 6 and 8 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 5

Theatre productions begin with “The Robber Bridegroom,” Broadway’s hit bluegrass musical. Shows take place at 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 1-2 and 8-9 and 2 p.m. on Nov. 3 and 10, all in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus.

“Junie B. Jones in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells,” a fun adaptation of Barbara Park’s Junie. B. Jones books, is a co-production with The WordPlayers. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13, and 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14, in the Clayton Performing Arts Center. Purchase tickets for theatre productions at www.pstcc.edu/tickets.

Pellissippi State’s Faculty Lecture Series features daytime lectures by the college’s faculty on topics as varied as literature, historical figures and current events. All lectures take place in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus. Fall lectures:

  • “What They Know: Privacy in the Age of Digital Tracking” by Lisa Bogaty at 12:30 p.m. Oct. 3
  • “Fairy Tales Aren’t Just for Children” by Sue Yamin at 2 p.m. Nov. 6

The Bagwell Gallery on the Hardin Valley Campus shares the Foothills Craft Guild Basket Show through Oct. 15, featuring basket artistry by local and regional artisans. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.

The Arts at Pellissippi State continues with events throughout the winter and spring. Highlights of spring 2014 include the Seventh Annual Festival of Cultures, an art exhibit featuring sculptor Raymond Padrón and the modern theatre production “Unnecessary Farce.”

For more information about a specific event in The Arts at Pellissippi State or for a full listing of the year’s events, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu. Requests should be made at least two weeks in advance.

Pellissippi State: Online privacy topic of Oct. 3 Faculty Lecture Series talk

Personal privacy rights have been a national hot topic recently, and Pellissippi State Community College’s next Faculty Lecture Series speaker has them on her mind.

Lisa Bogaty, associate professor in Business and Computer Technology, delivers the lecture “What They Know: Privacy in the Age of Digital Tracking” at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3. The free event, which takes place in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, is open to the public.

“There’s a huge debate going on about people’s right to privacy following various leaks about information gathering by businesses and governmental entities such as the NSA,” Bogaty said.

“The issue is, should we be collecting this level of data about the public when people have not been charged with a crime or are not the subject of an investigation, and how long should this information be stored?”

Bogaty, who teaches business administration and e-commerce courses at Pellissippi State, will focus on behavioral online tracking—tracking an internet user’s shopping patterns, search queries, online friends, social media behavior, and other information—and how businesses and marketers use that information. Bogaty will touch briefly on government online tracking.

“There was a time when almost everyone got junk advertisements in their emails,” she said, “but that doesn’t happen often anymore. Your online experience now involves very focused advertising based on your real shopping and searching patterns. These ads can only be this targeted by knowing you—and they do know you.”

Bogaty says she hopes her lecture leaves listeners with more questions than answers, since the debate about online privacy is an ongoing one.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “What They Know” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

‘The German Way of War’ kicks off 2013-2014 Faculty Lecture Series

Portrait of male with glasses in light blue buttoned shirt and tiePellissippi State Community College’s first presentation of the 2013-2014 Faculty Lecture Series introduces the community to “The German Way of War.” The free event takes place in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus at 12:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 12.

Jake Hamric, who teaches history for the college, delivers the lecture, focusing on the influences that he believes have made the German military’s way of war distinctive. The community is invited to attend.

“I’m looking forward to sharing something I have knowledge and passion about,” Hamric said.

“The lecture will argue that the German military has had a distinct way of war that is principally due to Germany’s history, culture and even geography. The lecture also will raise a second, broader issue, that all nations, states and kingdoms fight their own unique ways of war based on these same factors.”

Hamric earned a master’s degree from Eastern Michigan University, writing his thesis on Germany’s military campaign in Romania in World War I. He has been at Pellissippi State since 2006 and has taught full time since fall 2010. He teaches each of the World, Western and American history surveys the college offers, as well as for the Tennessee Consortium for International Studies study-abroad program.

“The German Way of War” is one of the events that make up “The Arts at Pellissippi State.” The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

For additional information about the lecture series or other “Arts at Pellissippi State” events, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

En garde! Dueling takes center stage in Pellissippi State’s Faculty Lecture Series

Two men dueling on stage

Charles R. Miller, head of theatrical productions and a Theatre faculty member at Pellissippi State Community College, is throwing down the glove, so to speak. He defies anyone to fail to enjoy his upcoming presentation, “The History of the Duel.”

The lecture, the last in the spring 2013 Faculty Lecture Series, takes place April 23 at 12:30 p.m. in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the college’s Hardin Valley Campus.

Miller’s lecture encompasses the origin of the duel and how it has changed throughout history. He also covers weapon styles and how they have changed, as well as the reasons duels were fought.

portrait of man with goatee in a dark gray striped shirt.“I will be giving some examples of very unusual duels,” he said, “because, historically, there have been some very odd things that happened.”

Miller will draw on his experience choreographing fights, and he will have support from students and colleagues when they demonstrate duels, weapon styles, and duel etiquette.

Given his background and interests, the duel is a natural lecture topic for Miller. He also says that he felt compelled to present something visual and theatrical after seeing some of the other faculty lectures given this academic year by his peers.

“Everybody has been doing theatrically based lectures—from Tyra Barrett’s ‘Economics: the Musical’ to Keith Norris’ lecture where he had fellow musicians and singers,” Miller said. “I had to try to do something very theatrical.”

As one of the Faculty Lecture Series presentations, the April 23 event is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State series. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

For additional information about “The History of the Duel,” call (865) 694-6400. To learn more about The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts.

To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State presents ‘What Dance Moves?’ faculty lecture March 21

mjenkinswebThe Faculty Lecture Series at Pellissippi State Community College features a range of presentations, from history and hobbits to Shakespeare and economics.

Finding uncharted territory in this eclectic group might not be easy, but Pellissippi State faculty member Maggie Jenkins has done it.

“What Dance Moves?” brings audiences of the Faculty Lecture Series a fresh subject and gives Jenkins a rare venue to talk about how her art form has impacted society.

The event is Thursday, March 21, 12:30-1:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus.

“I have focused on how dance interacts with, shapes and sometimes downright controls community values throughout history, political movements, social concerns,” said Jenkins.

The scope of the lecture is broad, beginning with the dithyrambs of ancient Greece and moving toward dance in the 21st century. Jenkins does offer one caveat: This is not a dance history lecture. And it promises to be visual.

For the last few months, she has viewed and collected several video clips for her presentation. Some of them come from the world literature classes she has taught for many years.

Jenkins has an ideal background for this lecture. She earned a master’s degree in English from the University of Tennessee in 1972 and followed up with a master’s degree in dance from UT in 1982. While teaching English literature and composition, she also performed with dance companies and ran a dance studio.

She has always seen her vocation and avocation as complementary, with each experience informing the other.

“I enjoyed the balance throughout the years. I did not see anything separate between them, as a matter of fact,” she said. “Every time I’m teaching something in literature class, I’m very much aware of a choreographer or a piece of a ballet, something that would connect historically to what we’re studying. It’s just impossible to separate the two.”

For more information, go to www.pstcc.edu/arts or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action for Pellissippi State at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State faculty lecture revisits Cold War

David-Key“I grew up in the last throes of the Cold War,” said David Key, who teaches history at Pellissippi State Community College. “It shaped my early worldview.”

The Cold War was more than a political standoff between the U.S. and Soviet Union. It also impacted American culture through sports, television and film, according to Key.

Key gives his perspective on the long-term conflict in “The Cold War,” Feb. 21, 12:30-1:30 p.m., in the Goins Building Auditorium at the Hardin Valley Campus. The talk is part of the ongoing Faculty Lecture Series, which highlights the talents of faculty members and local experts.

The speaker promises an entertaining discussion that looks at the Cold War’s impact on popular American culture in the U.S. The lecture also covers the conflict’s evolution, from the Berlin Airlift in the 1940s to the Cuban Missile Crisis in the 1960s to the fall of the Berlin Wall beginning in 1989.

“Some of Pellissippi State’s students were born five years after the Berlin Wall fell,” Key said. “That makes it necessary to look back and see how foreign policy in the U.S. has changed as we’ve moved from the policy of containment to a new set of issues in the post-Cold War world.”

Key has taught history at Pellissippi State for 12 years. He currently teaches U.S. History and serves as the assistant director of the Tennessee Consortium for International Studies, which is housed at Pellissippi State. He will lead a history-focused study abroad program in May to Eastern Europe.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of “The Arts at Pellissippi State.” The arts series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the visual arts.

The next lecture in the Faculty Lecture Series is faculty member Maggie Jenkins’ “What Dance Moves?” The event is March 21, 12:30-1:30 p.m., in the Goins Building Auditorium.

For more information, go to www.pstcc.edu/arts or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action for Pellissippi State at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi professor presents ‘A Hobbit’s Holiday’

Before Harry Potter, “Game of Thrones” and “The Lord of the Rings,” a timid, yet surprisingly resourceful hobbit set out on a series of adventures. Along the way, he fought trolls, spiders, orcs, and an ancient dragon, and ended up learning quite a bit about himself.

The journey of Bilbo Baggins, the hero of J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit,” is the subject of the upcoming Faculty Lecture Series presentation at Pellissippi State Community College. Faculty member Keith Norris’ talk—“A Hobbit’s Holiday: The Extraordinary Journey of Bilbo Baggins”—is Nov. 29, 7-8 p.m., in the Clayton Performing Arts Center at the Hardin Valley Campus.

Norris focuses on Bilbo’s journey, performing original stories, poems and musical compositions to evoke the magic of Tolkien’s novel. The family-friendly event is free and open to the public.

Norris will retell Bilbo’s adventures in five parts: “Drinking With Dwarves,” “The Trouble With Trolls,” “Matching Wits With a Monster,” “Songs for Spiders” and “Dueling With Dragons.”

Even though “The Hobbit, or There and Back Again” was published as a children’s novel in 1937, Norris says it also can teach adults a thing or two.

“Bilbo runs into a series of foes, and he learns enough to make sensible decisions,” said Norris. “He becomes the perfect person to stand between powerful people as a negotiator. As we grow up and learn to deal with our own bullies, enemies, monsters and villains, we learn to use creativity to effectively oppose them.”

Norris has read “The Hobbit” at least once a year since he was 12 and says the book has taught him that people can talk their way out of almost any unpleasant situation. More than that, he credits the book with influencing him to become an English professor and poet.

The next lecture is faculty member David Key’s “The Cold War,” Feb. 21, 12:30-1:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of Pellissippi State’s new arts series, “The Arts at Pellissippi State,” which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the visual arts.

For more information about the Faculty Lecture Series, email Keith Norris at knorris@pstcc.edu or Rob Lloyd at rtlloyd@pstcc.edu, or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action for Pellissippi State at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State faculty speaker addresses fighting heritage of East Tennesseans

Scottish and Irish immigrants poured into America in the 1700s and 1800s, many of them migrating to this region. Their impact on the culture of East Tennessee is still felt today, says Pat Riddle. Riddle is a faculty member and program coordinator of the Mechanical Engineering concentration in Engineering Technology at Pellissippi State Community College.

In a Nov. 15 presentation at the college titled “Born Fighting,” Riddle discusses the waves of emigration from the British Isles and how the thinking and behavior of native Tennesseans are still influenced by their ancestral heritage. The discussion is part of the 2012-13 Faculty Lecture Series, which showcases the expertise of Pellissippi State faculty members. The series lectures are designed to be informative and entertaining jumping castle sydney.

Riddle, who has Scottish blood coursing through his own veins, speaks at 12:30-1:30 p.m., in the Goins Building Auditorium at the Hardin Valley Campus. The event is free, and the community is invited to attend.

“Red hair and quick tempers are stereotypes of people of Scots-Irish descent,” said Riddle. “There’s a lot of truth in those stereotypes. The Scots are wired to fight.

“The Scots and Scots-Irish have always had to fight, and have long been known as the best fighters. The border region that includes Scotland and England has been in a constant state of war. The Normans and Saxons couldn’t conquer the locals. The Romans couldn’t conquer them, and ultimately they were sent to America to serve as a buffer between the ‘civilized’ colonies and Native Americans.”

The propensity to fight persists, Riddle says: The majority of the Marines come from Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Kentucky and Virginia. Fighting is in East Tennesseans’ DNA and is a pivotal element of our regional culture. The challenge we have today, he says, is to direct that impulse and energy in positive ways.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of Pellissippi State’s new arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the visual arts.

The next lecturer is the English Department’s Keith Norris. Norris speaks on “A Hobbit’s Holiday: The Extraordinary Journey of Bilbo Baggins,” on Nov. 29, 7-8 p.m., in the Clayton Performing Arts Center at the Hardin Valley Campus.

For more information about the Faculty Lecture Series, call Pellissippi State at (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action for Pellissippi State at (865) 694-6607 or humanresouces@pstcc.edu.