Pellissippi State: ‘Many Faces of Socrates’ topic of faculty lecture

portrait of male in suitEthics, logic, physics, politics, science. Western civilization owes a great debt to the classical Greek philosophers, and one Pellissippi State Community College faculty member pays his respects to one of those early sages in a lecture Thursday, Oct. 23.

Trent Eades, an assistant professor of English, presents “The Many Faces of Socrates” beginning at 12:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The lecture is free and the community is invited.
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“Socrates was one of the most influential people in history—not as a man who lays down laws, but as one who reasons,” Eades said. “He was credited with turning philosophy away from explanations of the world to exploration of the self—to ethics, morality, justice and the proper way for a person to live.”

Eades’ presentation, which includes cameo appearances by other Pellissippi State faculty members, focuses on Socrates as a multifaceted character. Born circa 470 BCE, the Athenian philosopher was the mentor to both Plato and Xenophon. His namesake “Socratic method”—based on asking and answering questions to provoke critical thinking—laid the foundation for Western systems of logic and philosophy.
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“The Many Faces of Socrates” is one of the events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. This year, the arts series celebrates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.
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For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Faculty lecture explores Mary Poppins, Maleficent approaches to teaching

headshot of female“Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, in a most delightful way!”

Unlike the heroine of the 1964 movie, Pellissippi State Community College’s Anne Pharr doesn’t blow into her classroom with an umbrella, but in her early years of teaching English, the assistant professor says she did make use of what she now calls the “Mary Poppins model” to engage students.

Pharr addresses the effectiveness of different teaching styles in an upcoming lecture at the college, “From Mary Poppins to Maleficent: Professorial Persona and Student Perception.” The event is at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 25, in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.
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“In an attempt to engage my students,” said Pharr, who has been teaching for two decades, “I added a spoonful of sugar to any task that might seem the least bit medicinal (or unpleasant) to my students. After a few years, I began to wonder if this approach to student engagement—putting all the responsibility on the teacher—set students up for long-term success.

“No one wants to be viewed as a Maleficent. But in my lecture, I hope faculty and students can consider this possibility: if an educator’s goal is to truly engage students, not merely entertain them, then temporary discomfort may well be worth it.”

The presentation by Pharr, the first of the 2014-15 Faculty Lecture Series, is free and open to the community.
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The Faculty Lecture Series is one of the many events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. Throughout the next year, the Arts series commemorates Pellissippi State’s 40th anniversary.

For more information about The Arts at Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Indie wrestling topic of March 26 Faculty Lecture Series talk

Portrait of a man with a mustache in navy blue suit with a yellow tieTurn reality on its head.

That’s the goal of John E. May, a photographer and Pellissippi State Community College faculty member, when he takes on the topic of independent wrestling at a Faculty Lecture Series talk Wednesday, March 26.

May’s lecture, “Indie Wrestling: Fabricating Reality,” begins at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the college’s Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The lecture is free and the community is invited.

“I’ve been photographing indie wrestling for about six years now. I’m fascinated by the spectacle of the event,” said May, an assistant professor in the Photography concentration of the Media Technologies program.

“When I tell people about photographing indie wrestling, normally what I hear is ‘It’s fake.’ Indie wrestling is a constructed reality, but so are movies and reality TV and fiction. During this lecture, we’re going to discuss constructed reality and turn it on its head.”

May plans to discuss the history of wrestling and take lecture attendees behind the scenes of an indie wrestling match. The independent wrestling circuit is made up of the smaller professional events as opposed to the major televised promotions.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “Indie Wrestling: Fabricating Reality” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Abolitionist John Brown topic of Feb. 27 talk

Joy-IngramJoy Ingram, an associate history professor at Pellissippi State Community College, delivers a presentation about white Civil War abolitionist John Brown Thursday, Feb. 27.

Part of the college’s Faculty Lecture Series, Ingram’s presentation, “John Brown: Maniacal Egoist or Moral Crusader?” begins at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

The event is free. The community is invited.

“The South was used to slave rebellions,” said Ingram, “but Brown’s uprising was the first time a person from the North had come to the South and committed acts of violence to try to free the slaves. Some historians say he sparked the Civil War.

“He’s been labeled crazy, a martyr, a religious zealot, a hero. I’m not going to try to put a label on him—I’ll leave that to the audience. But I will try to see what sets him apart from other abolitionists, what made him unique and what the end result of his actions was.”

Brown believed armed insurrection was the only way to end slavery in America. He and his followers instigated a number of conflicts in the South, culminating in an unsuccessful raid that he led on a federal armory in Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Brown was captured there and charged with treason, then hanged.

“Brown did not accomplish his plan to end slavery before his death,” said Ingram, “but his ideals lived on. The Harpers Ferry raid in 1859 escalated tension that eventually led to Southern secession and the Civil War.” The war began in 1861 and ended in 1865.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “John Brown” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

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