Pellissippi State: Y-12 machinists complete classroom portion of apprenticeship program

 

Y-12 Apprenticeship Graduation Ceremony
Pictured, in no order, are students in a Pellissippi State Community College and Y-12 National Security Complex apprenticeship program: Rachel Bachorek, Jason Brown, Jeff Bryant, John Bryant, Justin Dupas, Rashaad Gibbs, Brice Graham, Rachel Henley, Ryan Johnson, and Michael Lovelady.

Ten employees of Y-12 National Security Complex have completed the classroom training at Pellissippi State Community College as part of the first class of an apprenticeship program that grows talent from within Y-12.

The students — Rachel Bachorek, Jason Brown, Jeff Bryant, John Bryant, Justin Dupas, Rashaad Gibbs, Brice Graham, Rachel Henley, Ryan Johnson, and Michael Lovelady — received classroom instruction and hands-on training at Pellissippi State on topics related to working in an advanced technological workplace.

The completion ceremony was at Marble Springs, the historic home of Governor John Sevier. The apprentices built and donated a lawnmower and informational kiosk to the site.

“Our apprenticeship program has been a big investment at CNS Y-12,” said Beth Green, senior staff to the director of infrastructure, at the ceremony. “We wanted to make an investment in growing our employees into journeyman-level positions, and I’m proud to see the results in the work on these projects.”

The apprenticeship program is a four-year investment: the apprentices still must complete the remainder of their fourth year of actual on the job learning at Y-12 in order to finish.

 “It’s the end of one phase and the beginning of the next,” said Lovelady. “We’ll finish up this year, and once that is done we’ll be journeyman machinists.”

The program allows students the opportunity to earn substantial credit hours toward an Associate of Applied Science degree, plus the opportunity to finish additional coursework, including 15 credit hours of general education courses required to complete an Engineering Technology degree, with a concentration of the student’s choice.

“You’re giving yourself the best opportunity to grow in the company,” Lovelady said of those who participate.

 “Anything in life is worth working for,” said Bachorek. “I’m setting a grand example for my daughter. Once you have your education, no one can take that away from you.”

The participants also make up the first class of International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers union apprentices at Y-12. The partnership between the college, Y-12 and the union makes training more convenient and affordable.

Pellissippi State’s Engineering Technology faculty and Business and Community Services Division developed the curriculum for the program. BCS works with employers to create customized training and development solutions. For more information, visit www.pstcc.edu/bcs or call (865) 539-7167.

For more about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

 

Download this press release: Y12 Apprentice Program

Keurig Green Mountain, Pellissippi State partner to train employees

posted in: BCS, Cohorts, Community, TBR | 0
Row of males standing in front of a Pellissippi State Community College logo.
Keurig Green Mountain Inc. employees completed an industry-specific workforce development program at Pellissippi State Community College in late May. Pictured, in no order, are graduates Kevin Anderson, Marshall Boyd, Stanley Burgin, Robert Coleman, John Fronczak, Damien Kerr, John LaForge, Tim Mabry, Daniel North, Teddy Phillips, Rodney Reynolds, Josh Sicotte, Stephen Strader and Jeremiah Williams.

Pellissippi State Community College celebrated its first cohort of students completing an industry-specific workforce development program in late May.

The short-term certificate program was designed for Keurig Green Mountain Inc. employees to train them to install, troubleshoot and maintain industrial electrical systems. The curriculum was built through partnerships between Pellissippi State’s Engineering and Media Technologies department and Business and Community Services division with Keurig Green Mountain’s continuous learning department.

“We are pleased to work with our local employers to provide the training and education their employees need to be successful and productive,” said Teri Brahams, executive director of Economic and Workforce Development. “We can do that by either fully customizing a solution or packaging existing course offerings to accomplish the company’s workforce development needs.”

In this case, 14 Keurig employees earned 10 credits toward an Associate of Applied Science degree in Engineering Technology with a concentration in Electrical Engineering. The specialized Keurig certificate is based on Pellissippi State’s Electric Systems Technology certificate.

The Pellissippi State program serves as the model for similar partnerships Keurig Green Mountain is launching across the country with other community colleges.

The 14 graduates are Kevin Anderson, Marshall Boyd, Stanley Burgin, Robert Coleman, John Fronczak, Damien Kerr, John LaForge, Tim Mabry, Daniel North, Teddy Phillips, Rodney Reynolds, Josh Sicotte, Stephen Strader and Jeremiah Williams.

To learn more about the college’s workforce training opportunities, visit www.pstcc.edu/bcs or call (865) 539-7167. For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State ‘2+2’ alumnus named ‘Teacher of the Year’

Charlie ArpCharles Arp, a Pellissippi State Community College alumnus, has been named “Teacher of the Year” for Sweetwater City Schools in Monroe County. He teaches fifth grade at Brown Intermediate School.

Arp graduated through a teacher education partnership between Pellissippi State and Tennessee Technological University in 2012. Graduates from what is called the “2+2” program earn an Associate of Science in Teaching degree from Pellissippi State, then a Bachelor of Science degree in Multidisciplinary Studies and K-6 Teacher Licensure from Tennessee Tech.

Students in 2+2 attend the first two years as Pellissippi State students and the last two years as Tennessee Tech students—but they take all of their classes at Pellissippi State’s Hardin Valley Campus. A.S.T. is a cohort program, meaning the students go through the entire sequence together.

“Charlie was one of those students that you don’t forget,” said Barbara Jenkins, program coordinator of the A.S.T. program. “He knew what he wanted to do—to teach and make a difference with children in the elementary classroom—and he pursued his goal without hesitation.”

Arp says he was surprised and pleased to receive the Teacher of the Year recognition after teaching only three years. The honor is awarded through Little Tennessee Valley Educational Cooperative.

In April, he also earned Oak Ridge Associated Universities’ 2015 Extreme Classroom Makeover. The award comes with a $25,000 grand prize that funds new technology in the classroom.

Arp credits his success to Pellissippi State and Tennessee Tech and the partnership 2+2 program.

“Pellissippi State prepared me for nearly every aspect of teaching,” he said. “My students have had some of the highest possible science TCAP [Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program] scores in the state. I would say 75 percent of my teaching toolkit is from things I learned at Pellissippi State.

“The 2+2 program even helped prepare me for the interview for this job [at Brown Intermediate]. The only mistake I made was that I didn’t start the 2+2 program straight out of high school.”

Arp employs a number of distinctive techniques to teach his students, including using the Minecraft video game as a way of teaching mathematics and keeping children moving during math lessons by making use of a class-sized coordinate plane. When teaching reading and English lessons, Arp uses movie trailers based on novels to get his students interested in literature.

For more information about the A.S.T., 2+2 and other programs offered by or in partnership with Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Culinary Arts at Pellissippi State: pursue a career creating great food

Group of students in 2 rows in aprons and hats

Confit, crème brûlée, coq au vin. Gnocchi, pierogi, béchamel.

They’re more than just a tableful of fancy foreign foods—they’re what’s for dinner, and breakfast and lunch, when it’s prepared by students enrolled in the Pellissippi State Culinary Arts Institute.

Registration is now under way to launch an exciting culinary career through Pellissippi State Community College, with a new round of courses starting spring semester. The application deadline is Jan. 9, and classes begin Jan. 20.

 “Our students learn to cook to the sensory perceptions,” said Tom Gaddis, Culinary Arts program coordinator. “Before you even see fajitas, you hear them sizzling. Before you bite into them, you see the multicolored peppers. Culinary is truly an art.”

Students who pursue a two-year degree in Business/Culinary Arts learn about every aspect of the institutional kitchen: stocks and sauces (“There are five mother, or foundation, sauces,” one of them the creamy béchamel, said Gaddis); moist and dry cooking methods: blanching, braising, poaching, stewing, baking, barbecuing/smoking; equipment, safety; meats, from beef and fowl (coq au vin, confit) to rabbit and venison; seasonal vegetables; desserts (crème brûlée).

“Each instructor has his or her own specialty,” said Gaddis. “One chef is from Pittsburgh, and his specialty is Polish food like pierogi and gnocchi. Another specializes in Mediterranean, and another in Japanese.

“Students are able to pursue careers they genuinely love,” he said, “and Culinary Arts has maintained a very high level of job placement since its inception.”

Culinary Arts launched in 2010, part of a collaborative venture between Pellissippi State and the University of Tennessee. It’s a cohort, meaning students enter and complete the courses together, start to finish. Classes are at the Division Street Campus and in the laboratory kitchens at UT’s Culinary Institute off Neyland Drive.

Graduates earn an Associate of Applied Science degree in Business with a concentration in Culinary Arts. They’re also certified through the National Restaurant Association in food production and sanitation, and they can apply to the American Culinary Federation to become certified culinarians, the first step toward professional chef certification.

For more information about the Pellissippi State Culinary Arts Institute, contact Gaddis at (865) 971-5246 or tfgaddis@pstcc.edu or visit www.pstcc.edu/culinary or call (865) 694-6400.

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