Category Archives: Partnership

Pellissippi State partners with Family Justice Center to prevent violence

3 people standing in a row, 2 holding a plaque together.
Dr. L. Anthony Wise Jr., president of Pellissippi State Community College, marks a new partnership with the Family Justice Center during a signing ceremony Thursday, Aug. 7. He is joined by Amy Dilworth, director of the Family Justice Center, pictured at center, and Rebecca Ashford, vice president of Student Affairs.

Student safety is of paramount importance at Pellissippi State Community College, and to help preserve the health and wellness of both students and employees, the college is partnering with the Knoxville Family Justice Center to implement the Campus SaVE Act.

“We are very fortunate and grateful to have a partnership with the Family Justice Center,” said Mary Bledsoe, dean of students and assistant vice president of Student Affairs at Pellissippi State. “They provide valuable, important resources to our students who encounter or know someone who is in a dangerous situation.

“Pellissippi State is committed to supporting the survivors of violence as they seek to work through those situations. There are safe places on our campuses for them to go to find that support.”

Pellissippi State and the Family Justice Center signed a memorandum of understanding Thursday, Aug. 7.

With the Family Justice Center, Pellissippi State will provide training to students and employees on how to deal with violence, stalking, and trauma. One of the training tools is a video for new students. The video includes interviews with campus security staff, other college employees and Justice Center spokespeople. It gives tips on how to prevent dangerous situations and offers solutions for how to deal with such situations if they arise.

In addition, the Family Justice Center will provide training to Pellissippi State employees on how to work with victims of trauma. The center also will serve as a referral agency for any of those victims.

In the coming year, Pellissippi State will provide workshops for victim support groups, covering topics such as applying for college, writing resumes and exploring career options. Pellissippi State will provide mentoring for Family Justice Center clients who enroll.

The Campus SaVE Act, or the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act of 2013, affects both colleges and universities. Higher education institutions are required to educate students, faculty, and staff on the prevention of rape, domestic and dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

The SaVE Act was put into effect as part of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act, which was signed into law in March 2013. The SaVE Act applies to all students on campus, not just women.

“The SaVE Act gives us an outline for preventing domestic and sexual violence and for responding appropriately when victims of violence come onto our campus,” said Rebecca Ashford, vice president of Student Affairs.

The Knoxville Family Justice Center offers a variety of services to Knox-area victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, including counseling, support groups, safety planning, housing, and other assistance.

For more information about the Campus SaVE Act, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State: Blount County adds Automated Industrial Systems courses to fall offerings

3 people standing in front of wall with 2 shaking hands
L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State Community College president, left, accepts a check from Mike Brackett, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee’s senior vice president of corporate services and DENSO International America Inc.’s vice president of North American corporate planning and human resources, on behalf of the College and the Pellissippi State Foundation on Friday, Aug. 1. At right is Peggy Wilson, vice president of College Advancement and executive director of the Pellissippi State Foundation.

Pellissippi State Community College will offer courses in the college’s newest Engineering Technology concentration, Automated Industrial Systems, at its Blount County Campus this fall. Registration is going on now.

Automated Industrial Systems is one of seven concentrations in the Engineering Technology associate’s degree program. AIS prepares students to operate state-of-the-art automated manufacturing equipment, including programmable controller training systems, robotics and motor training equipment. The concentration launched at the Hardin Valley Campus in 2013 through a partnership with DENSO North America Foundation.

Pellissippi State is able to purchase equipment to expand the AIS concentration to Blount County thanks to a $48,500 grant from the DENSO Foundation.

“Because of support from the DENSO North America Foundation and our partnership with DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee, we’ve often been able to keep our engineering technologies and workforce training programs on the cutting edge,” said L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State president.

The grant was awarded through the Pellissippi State Foundation. Funds will go toward the purchase of 20 soldering stations; five Allen-Bradley programmable logic controllers; and 10 National Instruments Elvis II Plus modular platforms. The platforms combine several tools, including oscilloscopes, digital multimeters and dynamic signal analyzers, into one device.

“This grant will provide a state-of-the-art environment for workforce development,” said Peggy Wilson, vice president of College Advancement and executive director of the Pellissippi State Foundation.

“It will support the education and training needed for manufacturing in the East Tennessee region—for new technologists, company employees, and students transitioning in their careers.”

The Pellissippi State Foundation works to provide student scholarships and emergency loans, as well as to improve facilities and secure new equipment. For information about scholarships and grants offered through the Pellissippi State Foundation, visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation or call (865) 694-6528.

To learn more about AIS and other Engineering Technology concentrations, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

 

About the DENSO North America Foundation
A registered 501(c)3 corporate foundation, The DENSO North America Foundation is dedicated to helping students advance their education in engineering, technology and other related programs. Founded in 2001, the Foundation provides grants to colleges and universities throughout North America, helping our communities prosper through the development of a skilled and knowledgeable workforce. The Foundation also provides disaster relief grants through the American Red Cross to aid persons and communities in which DENSO operates. For more information, visit http://densofoundation.org

Pellissippi State aids small business with 3D printing prototype

Bill-Freshour

When Bill Freshour, an engineering lab tech at Pellissippi State Community College, spent much of his spring semester helping a small, young Etowah-based manufacturer develop a prototype laser scanner, he was just doing his job.

At least that’s what the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics would say. According to the BLS, engineering lab technicians “work to resolve issues and solve problems in manufacturing…. To accomplish their goals they use science, engineering and math, and the theories that accompany them.”

So, yes, Freshour did what his job description said he would do. But to the staff of Advanced Measurement Systems Inc., he did a whole lot more.

“This prototype is a very innovative design using new technology,” said Robert Watts, the company’s CEO, “and Bill and Pellissippi State were key to us being a part of that type of trial.”

Freshour got involved in working with Advanced Measurement Systems as part of Pellissippi State’s involvement in the Advanced Manufacturing and Prototype Center of East Tennessee. Known simply as AMP!, the center is a public-private partnership intended to revitalize manufacturing and create jobs.

For small and start-up companies, AMP! partners provide resources for improvement and growth that the companies often wouldn’t be able to afford otherwise. In the case of Advanced Measurement Systems, the competitive boost came from the technical expertise of Pellissippi State and the use of a 3D printer at Tech 20/20 in Oak Ridge.

Pellissippi State and Advanced Measurement Systems began working together after Tech 20/20 put out a call for businesses to take advantage of AMP! resources.

“This began as a student project for the AMP! Innovation Challenge, which pairs start-up small manufacturers in counties with high unemployment rates with STEM [science, technology, engineering, math] students,” said Mary Kocak. Kocak is a professor at Pellissippi State in the Engineering Technology degree program’s Mechanical Engineering concentration.

“The needs of AMS proved to be quite challenging,” she said, “so the project was taken on by Bill.”

Advanced Measurement Systems, a four-year-old McMinn County business that manufactures and sells cutting-edge laser electronic measuring systems to the collision repair industry, initially brought to the table the design for a prototype scanner that would allow greater accuracy in vehicle repair.

When a car’s frame is damaged, collision repair companies may use machines to reshape the frame and fix the vehicle. This type of repair was once measured by hand and then by individual laser measurements, but the new prototype allows continuous, dynamic measurements of a vehicle’s frame.

“This prototype is quite different than the scanner we are currently using,” said Watts. “For one, it’s significantly smaller, which prevents targets getting blocked and increases the accuracy of the measurements from the scanner to each target. It’s completely wireless, and it also uses only one laser beam, rather than two.”

The new prototype employs a green laser. Unlike a flashlight beam, which grows wider the farther it travels, a green laser retains its small diameter over a greater distance.

“That integrity over distance will allow us to measure larger vehicles, like motor homes and tractor trailers—which we currently can’t do—because the measurements are more accurate,” Watts said.

Every improvement to the laser scanner gives the business a competitive advantage in the collision repair industry.

Freshour took the company’s conceptual ideas and initial design for the prototype and created 16 separate 3D renderings of each piece needed to construct the revolving, turret-shaped laser. Those drawings were then sent to Tech 20/20 and manufactured using the company’s 3D printer.

AMS and Pellissippi State are now working together to modify design of the prototype further to allow it to be 3D printed in fewer pieces.

“If it can be made in one piece, as we think it can be,” said Watts, “that will save a lot of money in production and assembly. But it requires very precise design and manufacturing accuracy to be printed in one piece—no angle could be incorrect.”

If the one-piece design works as intended, no calibration of the laser will be needed, making the scanner even more accurate and reliable.

“Everything the college, Tech 20/20 and AMP! have done in collaboration with us has been invaluable in completing this project in a timely manner,” Watts said.

Advanced Measurement Systems hopes to show off the finished scanner at an October trade show. Using 3D printers, companies can create prototypes quickly, with less waste and cost than using traditional methods. The AMS prototype is still undergoing revisions, but in its current design, it could only be manufactured by a 3D printer.

“This is what the Mechanical Engineering/Engineering Technology team at Pellissippi State does,” said Freshour. “We work with industry on design problems, and help them to work things out. Local industry hires our students, so working with them also creates opportunities for our graduates.”

As Kocak points out, no single partner in the equation—neither Pellissippi State nor Advancement Measurement Systems nor Tech 20/20—could have brought the laser scanner project to fruition. And therein lies the benefit of the AMP! and other community partnerships in which the college participates.

AMP! was funded initially in 2012 by a federal grant. Under the helm of lead grant applicant Tech 20/20, Pellissippi State works together with collaborative partners Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee Center for Industrial Services.

Thanks to the AMP! grant, the college also has created a certificate program in Additive Manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, and provides more than $250,000 in scholarships for 125-plus students in Advanced Manufacturing courses.

For more information about Pellissippi State and its programs, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State dedicates Jenny and Randy Boyd Building

four people standing in front of building

In recognition of outstanding support by Randy and Jenny Boyd of higher education opportunities in this area, Pellissippi State Community College has dedicated its Strawberry Plains Campus building in the couple’s honor.

The Jenny and Randy Boyd Building was dedicated today, May 9.

“We are naming this building in recognition of Jenny and Randy Boyd for their support of Pellissippi State Community College and their dedication to increased access and opportunities for higher education in East Tennessee,” said L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State’s president.

In 2012, the Boyds donated $1 million to the Pellissippi State Foundation toward the purchase of the Strawberry Plains Campus. The campus, which is located at 7201 Strawberry Plains Pike, began offering classes in fall 2012.

“If we fail to give our children the opportunity to get the additional education and training they will need, we have failed them,” Randy Boyd said. “Our community colleges will see the majority of the growth in degrees in the next decade, and we are proud that one of the best in the country serves our community: Pellissippi State.

“Making college convenient and accessible is critical, and this new campus at Strawberry Plains will do that for East and South Knox county and neighboring counties. We’re happy to be able to help Pellissippi State fulfill its mission and that of our state with this new campus.”

Randy Boyd was Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s special advisor for higher education in 2013. In 2009, he helped start tnAchieves, which is a last-dollar scholarship and mentoring program for college students.

He also is a proponent of the governor’s “Drive to 55” campaign. The campaign’s goal is to increase the percentage of Tennesseans with college degrees or certificates to 55 percent by 2025.

Randy Boyd is founder, chairman and CEO of Radio Systems Corporation, maker of the PetSafe and SportDOG brands. He started the Knoxville-based company in 1991.

For more information about Pellissippi State or its campuses, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State to dedicate Jenny and Randy Boyd Building

In recognition of outstanding support of higher education opportunities in this area, Pellissippi State Community College will dedicate its Strawberry Plains Campus building in honor of Randy and Jenny Boyd on Friday, May 9.

The dedication ceremony begins at 10 a.m., and the campus is located at 7201 Strawberry Plains Pike. Tours of the building will follow.

“We are naming this building in recognition of Jenny and Randy Boyd for their support of Pellissippi State Community College and their dedication to increased access and opportunities for higher education in East Tennessee,” said L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State’s president.

In 2012, Randy and Jenny Boyd donated $1 million to the Pellissippi State Foundation toward the purchase of the Strawberry Plains Campus. The campus began offering classes in fall of that year.

Boyd, who is chairman of Radio Systems Corporation, also was Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s special advisor for higher education in 2013. In 2009, he helped start tnAchieves, a last-dollar scholarship and mentoring program for college students.

Boyd is a proponent of the governor’s “Drive to 55” campaign. The campaign’s goal to increase the percentage of Tennesseans with college degrees or certificates to 55 percent by 2025.

For more information about Pellissippi State or its campuses, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State supporting partner of Michigan-based manufacturing initiative

Pellissippi State Community College is a supporting partner in a $140 million U.S. Department of Defense-backed manufacturing institute in Michigan.

Pellissippi State is one of 60 members of a consortium for the Lightweight and Modern Metals Manufacturing Innovation (LM3I) Institute in Wayne County, Michigan. The consortium brings together aluminum, titanium and high-strength steel manufacturers with universities and laboratories that are pioneering new technology development and research.

As a supporting partner of the LM3I Institute, Pellissippi State committed to an in-kind/cost-share donation for staff and faculty time and lab equipment to assist in the project.

“To be part of this national effort is an honor for Pellissippi State,” said L. Anthony Wise Jr., the college’s president. “Through this project, Pellissippi State’s emphasis on advanced manufacturing training has found a national platform.

“We well know the importance of advanced manufacturing in the fields of research and development, and we’ll see that as this project seeks to build safer, more fuel-efficient vehicles and aircraft.”

Other local members include Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Alcoa and the University of Tennessee.

On Feb. 25, President Barack Obama announced that the LM3I Institute would receive $70 million in federal funding, matched by another $70 million in non-federal funding.

In addition to the research and development aspect of the project, the institute also will provide education, technical skills training, and workforce development. That aspect will address a growing disconnect between manufacturing technology and the training of workers.

“We look forward to working with LM3I on projects that will create a pipeline of talent capable of adopting the technologies developed by UT, ORNL and others,” said Teri Brahams, executive director of economic and workforce development at Pellissippi State.

LM3I is one of three institutes that will receive a combined $200 million in federal funding. The other two are the Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute in North Carolina and the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute, also based in Michigan.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State, Alcoa Foundation partner for student scholarships

A growing need for machinery operators with mechanical and electrical engineering training is being met through a partnership between Pellissippi State Community College and Alcoa Foundation.

Alcoa Foundation is supporting Pellissippi State students pursuing an industrial maintenance certificate or associate’s degree with a two-year, $50,000 scholarship grant.

Pellissippi State offers an Associate of Applied Science degree in Engineering Technology with a concentration in Industrial Maintenance, as well as a certificate in Industrial Maintenance Technology. The Industrial Maintenance concentration prepares students for careers in large manufacturing companies, working as multicraft, industrial machinery maintenance and repair technicians.

“There is an existing shortage of qualified men and women who are able to maintain and repair equipment in local industry,” said Peggy Mahan Wilson, vice president of College Advancement for Pellissippi State and executive director of the Pellissippi State Foundation.

“A great opportunity exists to provide students with the skills needed to obtain high-paying jobs in our community. The manufacturing industry is on the rebound in our region, and this scholarship grant will help provide students the necessary training to become experienced-and much needed-maintenance personnel.”

The Engineering Technology/Industrial Maintenance program at Pellissippi State is an Accelerated Higher Education Associate’s Degree program. AHEAD is designed to meet the needs of busy adults by offering shorter-term courses and credit for prior learning. Engineering Technology/Industrial Maintenance is also a cohort program. Cohorts allow students to move through their courses as a unified group, encouraging collaboration and fostering long-lasting relationships.

The Alcoa Foundation grant is expected to affect 80 Industrial Maintenance students directly through August 2015.

“This grant,” said Wilson, “will empower Industrial Maintenance students to secure the critical skills necessary to obtain self-sufficiency through the completion of their degree. We are pleased to receive this grant from Alcoa Foundation and honored to have a long history of partnership with them.”

The grant is a continuation of support from Alcoa Foundation, which last year completed a separate $37,000 donation for scholarships for students pursuing an associate’s degree in Engineering Technology/Industrial Maintenance.

For more about Industrial Maintenance, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/cohorts/industrial. To learn more about the college’s many giving opportunities, call the Pellissippi State Foundation at (865) 694-6528 or email foundation@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State, APSU partner to help working adults earn four-year Engineering Tech degree

Fifteen students at Pellissippi State Community College are enrolled in a bachelor’s degree program in Engineering Technology this fall. The new program, a partnership between Pellissippi State and Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, is designed to support working adults in earning a four-year degree.

Under what’s called a 2+2 agreement, a student may earn an associate’s degree in Engineering Technology, then a bachelor’s degree in either Manufacturing Engineering Technology or Mechanical Engineering Technology—without ever leaving the Pellissippi State campus.

“I think this is an example of a partnership that helps close the skills gap,” Pellissippi State President L. Anthony Wise Jr. said, “especially in terms of manufacturing skills in the Knoxville area. It creates a pathway for our students to move from the community college into a four-year university and earn an applied bachelor’s degree, and it offers working adults the convenience of staying at one location for all four years.”

When students complete the first two years of study, they will earn an Associate of Applied Science degree from Pellissippi State, historically a two-year school. The A.A.S. will be in Engineering Technology, with a concentration in Manufacturing Engineering or Mechanical Engineering. The final two years of the coursework will culminate in a Bachelor of Science degree from APSU.

To further meet the needs of working adults, classes also take place in the evening and the program is arranged as a cohort. In a cohort, students move together through their courses, beginning to end, as a group. Pellissippi State has offered cohorts through its Accelerated Higher Education Associate’s Degree program since 2007.

Wise and Timothy L. Hall, APSU president, signed the articulation agreement earlier this year for the new partnership. The program kicked off when the fall semester began in August.

APSU and Pellissippi State both have well-established Engineering Technology programs. The 2+2 will cover curricula in advanced manufacturing technologies, such as additive manufacturing. APSU offers a specialization in that discipline.

Pellissippi State’s Engineering Technology degree program also allows students to concentrate in Civil Engineering, Electrical Construction Management, Electrical Engineering or Industrial Maintenance.

For more information, visit www.pstcc.edu or contact Celeste Evans, who oversees Pellissippi State’s Cohort Programs, at clevans@pstcc.edu or (865) 539-7381.

DENSO, Pellissippi State partner on classroom automation equipment

Row of males and females standing in a line
DENSO North America Foundation presented a $50,000 check to Pellissippi State Community College officials during a ceremony and tour Wednesday, Aug. 21, on the college’s Hardin Valley Campus. The grant will be used to purchase programmable controller training systems, a robotic arm training station with software and motor training equipment for the newest Engineering Technology concentration, Automated Industrial Systems. Pictured from left are Kenneth Swayne, Engineering Technology faculty, Pellissippi State; Robyn Blair and Sara Harris, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee representatives; Carl Mallette, Engineering Technology; Brian Crawford, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee; Peggy Wilson, executive director, Pellissippi State Foundation; Pat Riddle, Engineering Technology; L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State president; Dennis Hopkins, vice president, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee; and Ted Lewis, vice president, Academic Affairs, Pellissippi State.

After more than 20 years of collaboration, Pellissippi State Community College and DENSO North America Foundation are joining forces once again, this time to help provide new equipment to students studying Automated Industrial Systems at the college.

Automated Industrial Systems is a new concentration in the Engineering Technology program that launches at Pellissippi State this fall. Students who graduate in Engineering Technology earn an Associate of Applied Science degree.

Representatives from DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee presented a $50,000 check on behalf of the DENSO North America Foundation to the Pellissippi State Foundation during a ceremony at the school’s Hardin Valley Campus Wednesday, Aug. 21. The donation will apply toward the purchase of programmable controller training systems, a robotic arm training station with software and motor training equipment.

“The partnership between DENSO and Pellissippi State is one that benefits both our students and DENSO employees,” said L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State president, “as, together, we strive to provide great education and technological training both on the job and in the classroom.”

group of males and females looking at computer and equipment

“For the auto industry to continue to advance, we need to further develop and invest in students’ technological skills—that’s what we hope to accomplish with Pellissippi State and this grant,” said Mike Brackett, DENSO Foundation board member and senior vice president of Corporate Services at DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee.

“At DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee, we specialize in robot design and programming and now have more than 800 robots on our production lines. Automation will continue to be critical in the future of DENSO and our automotive customers, meaning we need talented and knowledgeable people in this area.”

The equipment will be similar to that used in DENSO and other manufacturing settings where much of the automation is controlled by computer. With the robotic arm and programmable controller training systems, Pellissippi State students will learn relevant and technologically advanced techniques used in engineering technology and manufacturing.

“In order for students to be ready to go to work, we must continue to integrate newer technology into our training programs,” said Wise. “This cutting-edge equipment will be used for our new and existing engineering technology, workforce training, and STEM [science, technology, engineering and math] awareness programs.”

“Our partnership with DENSO is a win-win relationship,” said Peggy Wilson, executive director of the Pellissippi State Foundation. “Support from donors like DENSO helps the college provide its students the best education possible, and when those students graduate, they bring to employers the knowledge business and industry need to succeed.”

To learn more about Pellissippi State giving opportunities, call the Foundation at (865) 694-6528 or email foundation@pstcc.edu. For more information on Engineering Technology and other academic offerings, call Pellissippi State at (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu.

 

About DENSO

The DENSO North America Foundation was established in January 2001 to support the advancement of higher education in science, math, engineering and related business programs through grant-making to colleges and universities throughout North America. A priority is given to programs that demonstrate technological innovation and advance automotive engineering.

DENSO Corporation, headquartered in Kariya, Aichi prefecture, Japan, is a leading global automotive supplier of advanced technology, systems and components in the areas of thermal, powertrain control, electric, electronics, information and safety. Its customers include all the world’s major carmakers. Consolidated global sales for the fiscal year ending March 31 totaled U.S. $38.1 billion. In North America, DENSO employs more than 17,000 people, with consolidated sales totaling U.S. $6.8 billion for the fiscal year ending March 31.