Pellissippi State nominates DENSO for 2015 Corporate Philanthropist

The Smoky Mountain Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals recently named DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee as its 2015 Corporate Philanthropist of the Year, based on a nomination by the Pellissippi State Foundation. DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee has been a longtime supporter of Pellissippi State Community College, donating funds for equipment and student scholarships. Pictured in front row, from left, are Bob Booker and Emilie Denson of DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee with L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State president, and Peggy Wilson, executive director of the Pellissippi State Foundation and vice president of College Advancement. Also pictured are representatives from Pellissippi State and its Foundation.
The Smoky Mountain Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals recently named DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee as its 2015 Corporate Philanthropist of the Year, based on a nomination by the Pellissippi State Foundation. DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee has been a longtime supporter of Pellissippi State Community College, donating funds for equipment and student scholarships. Pictured in front row, from left, are Bob Booker and Emilie Denson of DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee with L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State president, and Peggy Wilson, executive director of the Pellissippi State Foundation and vice president of College Advancement. Also pictured are representatives from Pellissippi State and its Foundation.

Pellissippi State: Y-12 machinists complete classroom portion of apprenticeship program

 

Y-12 Apprenticeship Graduation Ceremony
Pictured, in no order, are students in a Pellissippi State Community College and Y-12 National Security Complex apprenticeship program: Rachel Bachorek, Jason Brown, Jeff Bryant, John Bryant, Justin Dupas, Rashaad Gibbs, Brice Graham, Rachel Henley, Ryan Johnson, and Michael Lovelady.

Ten employees of Y-12 National Security Complex have completed the classroom training at Pellissippi State Community College as part of the first class of an apprenticeship program that grows talent from within Y-12.

The students — Rachel Bachorek, Jason Brown, Jeff Bryant, John Bryant, Justin Dupas, Rashaad Gibbs, Brice Graham, Rachel Henley, Ryan Johnson, and Michael Lovelady — received classroom instruction and hands-on training at Pellissippi State on topics related to working in an advanced technological workplace.

The completion ceremony was at Marble Springs, the historic home of Governor John Sevier. The apprentices built and donated a lawnmower and informational kiosk to the site.

“Our apprenticeship program has been a big investment at CNS Y-12,” said Beth Green, senior staff to the director of infrastructure, at the ceremony. “We wanted to make an investment in growing our employees into journeyman-level positions, and I’m proud to see the results in the work on these projects.”

The apprenticeship program is a four-year investment: the apprentices still must complete the remainder of their fourth year of actual on the job learning at Y-12 in order to finish.

 “It’s the end of one phase and the beginning of the next,” said Lovelady. “We’ll finish up this year, and once that is done we’ll be journeyman machinists.”

The program allows students the opportunity to earn substantial credit hours toward an Associate of Applied Science degree, plus the opportunity to finish additional coursework, including 15 credit hours of general education courses required to complete an Engineering Technology degree, with a concentration of the student’s choice.

“You’re giving yourself the best opportunity to grow in the company,” Lovelady said of those who participate.

 “Anything in life is worth working for,” said Bachorek. “I’m setting a grand example for my daughter. Once you have your education, no one can take that away from you.”

The participants also make up the first class of International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers union apprentices at Y-12. The partnership between the college, Y-12 and the union makes training more convenient and affordable.

Pellissippi State’s Engineering Technology faculty and Business and Community Services Division developed the curriculum for the program. BCS works with employers to create customized training and development solutions. For more information, visit www.pstcc.edu/bcs or call (865) 539-7167.

For more about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

 

Download this press release: Y12 Apprentice Program

Pellissippi State, Alcoa Foundation partner to give industrial scholarships

Miguel Balladares
Pellissippi State Community College student Miguel Velez Balladares received a scholarship from the Alcoa Foundation that is allowing him to earn his Industrial Maintenance Technology degree.

 

Students in two Engineering Technology concentrations at Pellissippi State Community College are eligible for new scholarship money, thanks to a grant from the Alcoa Foundation.

The Pellissippi State Foundation received $50,000 from the Alcoa Foundation last month. The grant funds scholarships for students in Industrial Maintenance and Automated Industrial Systems, both of which are concentrations in the Engineering Technology degree program, over the next two years.

“These scholarships will empower students to secure the critical skills necessary to obtain a high-skill, high-wage job after earning their degree,” said Peggy Wilson, executive director of the Pellissippi State Foundation and vice president of College Advancement.

Earning an Associate of Applied Science degree in Engineering Technology with a concentration in Industrial Maintenance prepares students to work in manufacturing settings as multicraft, industrial machinery maintenance and repair technicians. The Automated Industrial Systems concentration prepares students to work with modern manufacturing control systems, including robotics, electrical systems and industrial process controls.

“These Engineering Technology concentrations are filling the gap that exists between the skills local manufacturing employers need and the skills that potential employees have,” Wilson said. “Student scholarships like those funded by the Alcoa Foundation make a higher education possible for students, whether they’re looking to start out in a promising field, transitioning between jobs or improving their knowledge base.”

“We are excited about Pellissippi State’s Engineering Technology program,” said Ken McMillen, Alcoa’s Tennessee operations location manager. “Alcoa is just one of the many manufacturing companies in our community that are expanding and looking for a qualified technical workforce. These scholarships are helping students gain the necessary skills to fill the pipeline and create a qualified workforce for manufacturing jobs.”

Alcoa Foundation grants funded 94 student scholarships in the 2013 and 2014 academic years.

The Alcoa grant funds came through the Pellissippi State Foundation. The Foundation works to provide student scholarships and emergency loans, as well as to improve facilities and secure new equipment.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Female students at Pellissippi State get career jump-start with engineering internships

posted in: Academics, Engineering, Grant, Partnership | 0
Pellissippi State Community College students Kathryne Farris, left, and Gabriela Sabin, right, spent their summers interning at DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee. Pictured with Harris and Sabin is Josh Brady, DENSO section leader in the machinery and tools division.
Pellissippi State Community College students Kathryne Farris, left, and Gabriela Sabin, right, spent their summers interning at DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee. Pictured with Farris and Sabin is Josh Brady, DENSO section leader in the machinery and tools division.

Although women make up about 61 percent of enrollees in Tennessee’s community colleges, they account for only 11 percent of students who enter engineering technology programs.

This summer, Pellissippi State Community College provided three of its female students, two of whom are pursuing an Engineering Technology degree and one who plans to transfer to a four-year institution to major in engineering, with a jump-start on their careers.

Thanks to a grant from the Tennessee Space Grant Consortium, Pellissippi State was able to link all three students with engineering-related internships. The consortium, which is funded by NASA, is made up of five Tennessee Board of Regents community colleges. This is the first time that a NASA Space Grant has been awarded to Tennessee community colleges.

Kathryne Farris, who is in the Mechanical Engineering concentration of the Engineering Technology program, spent her summer working with DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee in Maryville. DENSO is one of the world’s largest automotive parts manufacturers and one of the largest employers in Blount County.

 “I’ve appreciated the inside look at the business side of jobs after graduation — which honestly has been rather terrifying to think of for me,” she said. “This has most definitely helped. My fears of the unknown have been quelled a bit, and I feel like I could enter the workforce after graduation with some extra confidence.”

That’s the goal of the internships, says Lynn Klett, an assistant professor in Engineering Technology and the Pellissippi State faculty member in charge of the grant consortium. Klett also is a mentor to the grant participants.

The Pellissippi State portion of the grant is $110,715, $45,000 of which is earmarked for scholarships to students majoring in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) programs. The award is meant to boost enrollment among women and other underrepresented groups. The funding paid for the summer internship opportunities as part of the overall scholarship package for each Pellissippi State recipient.

Farris plans to graduate in May 2016. So does scholarship recipient Gabriela Sabin, a Computer Science student. Once she earns her degree at Pellissippi State, she intends to transfer to a university, majoring in engineering. Sabin also interned at DENSO.

“I’ve been shadowing an electrical engineering co-op student who is troubleshooting and powering up a new machine,” she said. “I feel like this internship is giving me useful experience into what working as an electrical engineer would be like. I like knowing that I’ve made something that works and that people will use.”

Makayla Edwards, like Farris, a Mechanical Engineering/Engineering Technology student, will take a different path once she graduates from Pellissippi State. Instead of continuing on to a four-year school, she’ll enter the workforce directly.

“[Earning a two-year degree] is much more hands-on and applicable,” she said. “My internship was at Pellissippi State, where I worked with professor Klett in additive manufacturing. Right now, I have a huge interest in 3D printing.”

This summer, Edwards built her own 3D printer from a kit with the help of Klett and student mentors. Currently, she’s working on the design of a bicycle made from bamboo, which is considered a renewable resource because of its quick growth rate. The moving parts will be made using a 3D printer.

“I would like to think that whatever I do in the future will impact the world in a positive way,” Edwards said. “The internship has given me really useful experience. Without it, I doubt I would have had such a jump-start on 3D printing and CAD [computer-aided design].”

NASA awarded a total of $499,689 to the Tennessee Space Grant Consortium, which is headquartered at Vanderbilt University.

The award is the result of a proposal coordinated and submitted by the Pellissippi State Foundation. In total, the Pellissippi State portion of the grant will provide each of 11 students with a $4,000 scholarship.

In addition, the grant included funds to send a group from each of the community colleges to Florida to compete in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ SoutheastCon robotics event. It also will fund two grant participants to attend the 10-week Summer Robotics Program at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

For more information about this and other Foundation scholarships, visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation/scholarships or call (865) 694-6528. For information about the Tennessee Space Grant Consortium, email Klett at lbklett@pstcc.edu.

For more information about Pellissippi State and the Engineering Technology program, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Download the press releaseNASA Scholars Intern

{Click each photograph to access a high-res version}

Makayla Edwards
Makayla Edwards spent the summer interning at Pellissippi State, where she worked with a 3D printer (foreground) to make, among other things, a small plastic lizard.
Gabriela Sabin and Josh Brady
Pellissippi State student Gabriela Sabin with Josh Brady, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee.
Makayla Edwards
Makayla Edwards spent the summer interning at Pellissippi State, where she worked with a 3D printer (foreground).
Pellissippi State student Kathryne Farris with Josh Brady, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee.
Pellissippi State student Kathryne Farris with Josh Brady, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee.
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