Pellissippi State students finish tops in Math Bowl

posted in: Academics, Awards, Students | 0
Gabrielle Thress placed first in Tennessee in the 2015 Math Bowl Competition for her scores in precalculus.
Gabrielle Thress placed first in Tennessee in the 2015 Math Bowl Competition for her scores in precalculus.

A group of Pellissippi State Community College students woke early on a Saturday in late November to take part in the annual Pellissippi State Math Bowl.

The competition allows participants to compete for high scores in five divisions: survey of mathematics, calculus A and B, precalculus, and statistics. Students’ test scores are then compared to those of students at other community colleges in Tennessee for statewide prizes.

Pellissippi State student Gabrielle Thress placed first in the state in the precalculus division. Also in the statewide competition, Pellissippi State students Hani Patel and Patrick Stephens placed second and third, respectively, in calculus A, while Chelsey Buchanan and Madison Bauer finished second and third, respectively, in survey of mathematics.

Pellissippi State’s Math Bowl is part of the annual State Mathematics Competition, sponsored by the Tennessee Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges. In addition to state prizes, Pellissippi State — thanks to a grant from Oak Ridge Associated Universities — awards its top finishers in each subject with additional cash prizes.

Students who finished in the top three in each test category: Madison Bauer, Chelsey Buchanan, Hong Do, Eryca Henry, Tamia Hurst, Nabel Jaser, Andrew Jerome, Rebecca Lengfellner, Hani Patel, Son Quang, Alec Riden, Patrick Stephens, John Studer, Gabrielle Thress and Victoria Villella.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Download this press release: Math Bowl 2015

Nabeel Jaser
Nabeel Jaser
Hong Do, left, and Hani Patel.
Hong Do, left, and Hani Patel.
From left, Son Quang, Madison Bauer and Andrew Jerome.
From left, Son Quang, Madison Bauer and Andrew Jerome.

Pellissippi State: Y-12 machinists complete classroom portion of apprenticeship program

 

Y-12 Apprenticeship Graduation Ceremony
Pictured, in no order, are students in a Pellissippi State Community College and Y-12 National Security Complex apprenticeship program: Rachel Bachorek, Jason Brown, Jeff Bryant, John Bryant, Justin Dupas, Rashaad Gibbs, Brice Graham, Rachel Henley, Ryan Johnson, and Michael Lovelady.

Ten employees of Y-12 National Security Complex have completed the classroom training at Pellissippi State Community College as part of the first class of an apprenticeship program that grows talent from within Y-12.

The students — Rachel Bachorek, Jason Brown, Jeff Bryant, John Bryant, Justin Dupas, Rashaad Gibbs, Brice Graham, Rachel Henley, Ryan Johnson, and Michael Lovelady — received classroom instruction and hands-on training at Pellissippi State on topics related to working in an advanced technological workplace.

The completion ceremony was at Marble Springs, the historic home of Governor John Sevier. The apprentices built and donated a lawnmower and informational kiosk to the site.

“Our apprenticeship program has been a big investment at CNS Y-12,” said Beth Green, senior staff to the director of infrastructure, at the ceremony. “We wanted to make an investment in growing our employees into journeyman-level positions, and I’m proud to see the results in the work on these projects.”

The apprenticeship program is a four-year investment: the apprentices still must complete the remainder of their fourth year of actual on the job learning at Y-12 in order to finish.

 “It’s the end of one phase and the beginning of the next,” said Lovelady. “We’ll finish up this year, and once that is done we’ll be journeyman machinists.”

The program allows students the opportunity to earn substantial credit hours toward an Associate of Applied Science degree, plus the opportunity to finish additional coursework, including 15 credit hours of general education courses required to complete an Engineering Technology degree, with a concentration of the student’s choice.

“You’re giving yourself the best opportunity to grow in the company,” Lovelady said of those who participate.

 “Anything in life is worth working for,” said Bachorek. “I’m setting a grand example for my daughter. Once you have your education, no one can take that away from you.”

The participants also make up the first class of International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers union apprentices at Y-12. The partnership between the college, Y-12 and the union makes training more convenient and affordable.

Pellissippi State’s Engineering Technology faculty and Business and Community Services Division developed the curriculum for the program. BCS works with employers to create customized training and development solutions. For more information, visit www.pstcc.edu/bcs or call (865) 539-7167.

For more about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

 

Download this press release: Y12 Apprentice Program

Female Pellissippi State students benefit from attending women engineers conference

posted in: Academics, Engineering, Grant, Students | 0
Makayla Edwards
Makayla Edwards is one of the Pellissippi State Community College students who attended the recent Society of Women Engineers conference.

Female Pellissippi State Community College students pursuing a career in engineering had the chance to hear from some of the nation’s most prominent women engineers at a recent conference.

“The SWE [Society of Women Engineers] conference was an amazing opportunity,” said Ravenne Hall, one of the students who attended. “The workshops were helpful and thorough. The biggest benefit was to meet all the amazing women who, just like me one day, work in the technical industry. It was very inspiring to see that women really have accomplished amazing feats and are expanding and sharing their great minds with the world.”

The conference took place in Nashville in late October. It highlighted successful female engineers and the realities that women face when they enter traditionally male-dominated fields in science, technology, engineering, and math.

“My experience at the conference was inspirational: just to be around fellow like-minded female engineers who have accomplished so much,” said Makayla Edwards.

“I learned so much, but most important to me was how to negotiate your salary. That’s invaluable information that I’ll treasure for the rest of my life,” said Ines Mena-Solano.

Hall, along with Edwards and Mena-Solano, are recipients of scholarships funded through the Tennessee Community College Space Grant Consortium, part of the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System.

The NASA grant seeks to increase enrollment and retention in STEM fields among women and underrepresented minorities.

“Women only account for about 11 percent of the enrollment in engineering technology programs in Tennessee community colleges,” said Lynn Klett, “even though women make up 61 percent of overall community college enrollment.” Klett manages the NASA grant at Pellissippi State.

“Out-of-classroom experiences like this increase retention rates for our students by encouraging them to build relationships with each other and with their professors,” said Kathleen Scruggs, student completion coach for the NASA grant at Pellissippi State.

In all, nine female Pellissippi State students attended the conference with Scruggs and Klett. The NASA grant covered not only the cost of the conference but also the students’ ongoing membership in the Society of Women Engineers.

Funding provided by the NASA grant comes through the Pellissippi State Foundation. The Foundation works to provide student scholarships and emergency loans, as well as to improve facilities and secure new equipment. For more information about the Foundation, visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation or call (865) 694-6528.

For more information about Pellissippi State’s Engineering Technology degree program and concentrations, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. For more about the Foundation and giving opportunities, call (865) 694-6528 or visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation.

Download this press releaseNASA Scholars Attend Conference

Pellissippi State, Alcoa Foundation partner to give industrial scholarships

Miguel Balladares
Pellissippi State Community College student Miguel Velez Balladares received a scholarship from the Alcoa Foundation that is allowing him to earn his Industrial Maintenance Technology degree.

 

Students in two Engineering Technology concentrations at Pellissippi State Community College are eligible for new scholarship money, thanks to a grant from the Alcoa Foundation.

The Pellissippi State Foundation received $50,000 from the Alcoa Foundation last month. The grant funds scholarships for students in Industrial Maintenance and Automated Industrial Systems, both of which are concentrations in the Engineering Technology degree program, over the next two years.

“These scholarships will empower students to secure the critical skills necessary to obtain a high-skill, high-wage job after earning their degree,” said Peggy Wilson, executive director of the Pellissippi State Foundation and vice president of College Advancement.

Earning an Associate of Applied Science degree in Engineering Technology with a concentration in Industrial Maintenance prepares students to work in manufacturing settings as multicraft, industrial machinery maintenance and repair technicians. The Automated Industrial Systems concentration prepares students to work with modern manufacturing control systems, including robotics, electrical systems and industrial process controls.

“These Engineering Technology concentrations are filling the gap that exists between the skills local manufacturing employers need and the skills that potential employees have,” Wilson said. “Student scholarships like those funded by the Alcoa Foundation make a higher education possible for students, whether they’re looking to start out in a promising field, transitioning between jobs or improving their knowledge base.”

“We are excited about Pellissippi State’s Engineering Technology program,” said Ken McMillen, Alcoa’s Tennessee operations location manager. “Alcoa is just one of the many manufacturing companies in our community that are expanding and looking for a qualified technical workforce. These scholarships are helping students gain the necessary skills to fill the pipeline and create a qualified workforce for manufacturing jobs.”

Alcoa Foundation grants funded 94 student scholarships in the 2013 and 2014 academic years.

The Alcoa grant funds came through the Pellissippi State Foundation. The Foundation works to provide student scholarships and emergency loans, as well as to improve facilities and secure new equipment.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

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