Pellissippi State Foundation selects new executive director

posted in: Pellissippi State Foundation, TBR | 0
Aneisa McDonald
Aneisa McDonald

The Pellissippi State Foundation has a new executive director to lead its fundraising efforts. Aneisa McDonald, an experienced local fundraising professional, began her tenure as executive director this month.

“This feels like the greatest professional achievement of my career,” McDonald said. “I’m honored to serve. I walk through these doors every morning and see the needs of Pellissippi State’s students, and I look forward to working with our Foundation board and staff members to fulfill those needs through the gifts of our very generous donors.”

McDonald, previously the director of planned and annual giving for the Foundation, succeeds Peggy Wilson, who retired in December after 33 years at Pellissippi State. The Pellissippi State Foundation works to provide funding for student scholarships and emergency loans, facility improvements and new equipment at Pellissippi State Community College.

“When the Foundation can match a donor who wishes to give with a student who needs a scholarship or an academic program that needs new equipment, everybody wins,” McDonald said.

“Last week, the Foundation was able to give a scholarship to a student who had lost everything they owned in a fire and still retained a 4.0 GPA. That scholarship doesn’t replace what that student lost, but it can keep him on the path toward completing his dream.”

Before coming to work for the Pellissippi State Foundation in 2014, McDonald worked for Knox County Schools, the Metropolitan Drug Commission and the Arts Council of Greater Knoxville. She received her Master of Science in Education from the University of Tennessee.

She is a Tennessee Promise mentor and supports numerous organizations, including Introduction Knoxville, the Knoxville Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, East Tennessee Children’s Hospital and the Emma Walker Memorial Fund.

For more information about the Pellissippi State Foundation, visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation or call 865-694-6528.

Pellissippi State generates $263 million annual economic impact

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Over the past five years, Pellissippi State Community College has pumped an average of $263 million per year into the local economy.

From 2011-2016, that amounts to about $1.3 billion in economic impact, or the value of business volume, jobs and individual income in Knox and Blount counties that’s tied to Pellissippi State.

“Pellissippi State’s economic impact in our community is important, but we at the college consider it of greater import that we work to change the lives of everyone who comes through our doors,” said Pellissippi State President L. Anthony Wise Jr. “Our most significant impact comes from graduates who pursue their dreams and, in turn, give back to our community.”

Of the college’s $1.3 billion in total impact, the majority — $1.05 billion — can be attributed to the infusion of new, non-local revenues.

“This impact would likely not have occurred without the presence of Pellissippi State in the area,” said educational consultant Fred H. Martin, who conducted the study.

Every single dollar of local revenue that comes into Pellissippi State generates an estimated annual return on investment of at least $6.51, comprised of $3.16 in local business volume, plus at least $3.35 in individual income.

The report also studied what a degree from Pellissippi State might mean for a student. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, associate degree graduates can expect to earn about $470,800 more over their work lifetime than if they only had a high school diploma. For Pellissippi State’s 1,429 graduates in academic year 2015-2016, this means an additional $673 million in lifetime earnings and $2.7 million in additional annual tax payments, which benefit the economy.

Pellissippi State’s business volume impact in the community amounted to about $640 million from 2011-2016. Of that total, $504 million came from non-local revenues such as state appropriations, grants, contracts and federal student financial aid revenues.

Over the five-year period, Pellissippi State’s expenditures created and sustained an estimated 43,855 jobs. More than 34,000 of those were created by external or new funds. The College itself employed 2,734 full-time employees from 2011-2016.

The total impact of Pellissippi State’s expenditures on personal income in the area amounts to about $678 million over the past five years, including $547 million from new or external funds.

The complete 29th annual analysis of Pellissippi State’s economic impact in Knox and Blount counties can be accessed at www.pstcc.edu/ieap under “Fact Books and Data Reports.” For more information, visit www.pstcc.edu or call 865-694-6400.

Pellissippi State, Carson-Newman partner on transfer pathways for students

Pellissippi State Community College President L. Anthony Wise Jr., right, with Carson Newman University Provost Paul Percy.
Pellissippi State Community College President L. Anthony Wise Jr., right, with Carson-Newman University Provost Paul Percy.

Pellissippi State Community College and Carson-Newman University are partnering to ensure transfer pathways are seamless for community college students who go on to earn their four-year degrees.

The partnership specifically targets certain transfer programs, which allow students to earn an associate degree and then transfer those credits to a four-year university. The Carson-Newman partnership will allow seamless transfer for Pellissippi State students earning an Associate of Fine Arts in Music and an Associate of Science in Teaching with a concentration for preschool through grade three, as well as the Tennessee Transfer Pathway degree in Business Administration. Students who earn those degrees from Pellissippi State can then transfer to Carson-Newman to complete bachelor’s degrees in Education, Music and Business.

Additionally, students who earn certain associate degrees from Pellissippi State can transfer to Carson-Newman and enter bachelor’s degree programs in general studies or in Pre-Nursing.

“Partnerships like this one allow community college students to more easily find their way along the path to a higher education,” said L. Anthony Wise Jr., president of Pellissippi State.

“We are proud to partner with Carson-Newman University to enable our students to successfully complete a bachelor’s degree in these programs,” said Ted Lewis, vice president of Academic Affairs at Pellissippi State.

“This is a significant partnership between two great academic institutions that will benefit East Tennessee students by providing the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree. It’s a win-win all-around,” said Paul Percy, provost of Carson-Newman.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call 865-694-6400. For more information about Carson-Newman, visit www.cn.edu or call 865-471-2000.

Pellissippi State students score highest in state at Math Bowl

posted in: Academics, Awards, Students, TBR | 0
Pictured, left to right, are some of Pellissippi State’s top finishers in the recent Math Bowl: Ethan Vals, Andrew Hendershott, Son Quang, Lily Turaski, Liam Schenk and Rebekah Meece.
Pictured, left to right, are some of Pellissippi State’s top finishers in the recent Math Bowl: Ethan Vals, Andrew Hendershott, Son Quang, Lily Turaski, Liam Schenk and Rebekah Meece.

 

Students from Pellissippi State Community College took eight of the top 15 places in a recent statewide mathematics competition among community colleges.

A total of 114 Pellissippi State students competed in the annual Pellissippi State Math Bowl in five divisions — survey of mathematics, calculus A and B, precalculus and statistics. Community college students from across the state also participated in the competition at their home college. Their scores were then compared to those of other students entered in the Math Bowl.

Pellissippi State students Lily Turaski and Alex Shipe finished first and second, respectively, in the statewide calculus A division. Abe Joo finished third statewide in calculus B, while Symon Elliott, Alana Farris and Morgan Bailey were first, second and third statewide in survey of mathematics. Liam Schenk and Ana Brantley scored first and second place in the statewide statistics division.

The Pellissippi State Math Bowl is part of the annual State Mathematics Competition, sponsored by the Tennessee Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges. In addition to state prizes, Pellissippi State — thanks to a grant from Oak Ridge Associated Universities — awards its top finishers in each subject with additional cash prizes.

In addition to the winners named above, Pellissippi State also recognized Ethan Vals in calculus A; Andrew Hendershott, Katie Moore and Victoria Villella in precalculus; Son Quang and Rebekah Meece in calculus B and Natalie Keener in statistics.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call 865- 694-6400.

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