Category Archives: Blount County

Pellissippi State hosts April 20 Dough Dash 5K Run/Fun Walk for Scholarships

Whether you’re interested in running against the clock or simply enjoying a spring morning walk, by participating in the April 20 Dough Dash 5K Run/Fun Walk for Scholarships at Pellissippi State Community College, you’ll also be raising money to support students.

The Alumni Association-hosted 5K run/fun walk serves as a fundraiser for the Pellissippi State Foundation’s General Scholarship Fund. The event is part of the Run and See Tennessee Grand Prix, which encourages runners to compete in races throughout Tennessee and bordering states.

Dough Dash provides the opportunity for participants to run a 5K course or walk up to one mile. Medallions will be awarded in the categories of Male/Female Top Three Overall, Male/Female Top Master and Grandmaster, and Three Deep Male/Female in various age groups.

The event begins at Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus. The 5K and fun walk courses consist of an on-campus asphalt trail, and the 5K continues on scenic off-campus back roads. The run and walk end on the campus, located at 2731 W. Lamar Alexander Pkwy. in Friendsville.

Early registration is $20 per participant and continues through April 6. Those who register after April 6, including on event day, pay $25. Dough Dash begins at 8 a.m., and onsite registration is 7-7:30 a.m. No refunds will be given.

Participants may register online or by mail. To register online, go to www.runnerreg.net/search/event.aspx?id=18396. To register by mail, print out the entry form at www.pstcc.edu/alumni/event and mail it with your payment to Pellissippi State Alumni Association, P.O. Box 22990, 10915 Hardin Valley Rd., Knoxville 37933-0990.

Those who plan to take part in the 5K run and want tips on how to train are invited to join the free Couch to 5K Program, offered by Pellissippi State’s Student Recreation Center. Participants will receive training tools each week leading up to the event via email, Twitter and Facebook.

For additional information on the Dough Dash or Couch to 5K Program, contact the Alumni Relations office at (865) 539-7275 or alumni@pstcc.edu.

To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu. Requests should be made at least two weeks in advance.

Open house, chance to win scholarship at Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus

Members of the community are invited to attend an open house at the Blount County Campus of Pellissippi State Community College on Thursday, Feb. 21. Scheduled 4-6 p.m., the event offers information for potential students, tours and opportunities to learn about community events hosted at the campus.

There is also a drawing for a $250 scholarship provided by the Pellissippi State Foundation. All attendees are eligible for the drawing.

Pellissippi State staff members will be on hand to share information with potential students regarding programs of study, admission, distance learning, financial aid and dual enrollment. Dual enrollment allows high school students to earn high school and college credit simultaneously for selected courses.

Tours of the campus building are ongoing throughout the two-hour event. A 2010 recipient of the Governor’s Environmental Stewardship Award, the Blount County Campus includes plenty of parking for bicycles, as well as shower and changing facilities for people who ride their bikes to school. The campus also has convenient reserved parking for carpool vehicles and charging stations for alternative fuel vehicles.

The $22 million state-of-the-art campus opened in 2010. Pellissippi State has offered classes in Blount County since 1985.

Open house attendees can learn about the variety of community events hosted at the campus—among them, movies and guest lectures. In addition to the 100-seat West Chevrolet Auditorium, the campus has one classroom designed specifically for distance education.

The Manufacturing Tech Lab provides 2,500 square feet of space dedicated to workforce training, including the Claude F. Moon Welding Center. Pellissippi State’s Business and Community Services Division offers both industrial training and non-credit courses at the campus.

The open house is free, and there is no need to register. Activities take place in the William “Keith” McCord Lobby.

Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus is located at 2731 W. Lamar Alexander Pkwy. For additional information, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu.

To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State leads region in manufacturing education and training

Last year, Pellissippi State Community College enhanced its reputation as a leader in manufacturing education, marked the graduation of its first Nursing class, and achieved full state approval for its Nursing program. Nursing is offered at the Blount County Campus in Friendsville and the Magnolia Avenue Campus in Knoxville.

This year, the college is poised to build on its academic programs, as well as on its student participation in study abroad—already the highest of any U.S. community college.

Supporting students in completing college and increasing access to and placing graduates in good jobs serve as key priorities in 2013, said L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State president.

“We continue to focus on helping students complete their studies in both transfer programs and career/technical fields that lead to outstanding transfer opportunities and excellent jobs,” Wise said.

Pellissippi State also is reviewing its distance education program to find ways to provide additional pathways to degree completion.

“We’re going to change the way we use distance education—and this will certainly affect Blount County—to help students at our site campuses complete career and transfer degrees on those campuses,” Wise said.

Manufacturing education and training

At the state-of-the-art Manufacturing Tech Lab, the Blount County Campus has experienced an uptick in apprenticeship training through the college’s Business and Community Services Division and Engineering Technology degree program. For example, Cherokee Millwright revived its apprenticeship program with the consultation and expertise of BCS. BCS and Engineering Technology also developed curricula and training for Y-12 machinist apprentices at the Hardin Valley Campus.

This past year, the college played a key role in creating a national curriculum for the Automotive Manufacturing Technical Education Collaborative. AMTEC is a collaboration of colleges and industry to better prepare skilled technicians and manufacturing engineers for work in auto manufacturing and technology. The curriculum contribution helped Pellissippi State land two federal grants to fund manufacturing education, training and workforce development in East Tennessee.

“These types of advanced manufacturing programs, they really feed into what seems to be a growth in manufacturing in the local economy,” Wise said. “In terms of our career programs, that’s exactly where we need to be.”

The first grant came through the U.S. Department of Labor in September. The Labor Department awarded $15 million to an educational consortium that included Pellissippi State. The grant provides a minimum of $760,000 to each consortium member during a three-year period.

The award funds manufacturing job training to fill a shortage of skilled workers locally. The goal of the grant meets a long-term ambition, one that dovetails with Pellissippi State’s mission: to help transform manufacturing education.

The funding will boost instructional capacity, pay for equipment and technical support, and improve online delivery of the college’s Engineering Technology classes.

A few weeks after the Labor Department grant was announced, Pellissippi State learned it was the recipient of a second federal grant for manufacturing education.

The college plays a key role in the Advanced Manufacturing and Prototype Center of East Tennessee (AMP!), one of 10 public-private partnerships to receive a total of $20 million to revitalize U.S. manufacturing and create jobs. Pellissippi State’s partners on the grant include Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee’s Center for Industrial Services and Tech 20/20, the lead grant applicant.

The regional consortium’s proposal was selected through a federal multi-agency competition called the Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge.

The grant enables Pellissippi State to offer a certificate in Additive Manufacturing and update existing curricula. It funds more than $250,000 in scholarships for students in Advanced Manufacturing courses.

Additive manufacturing describes the technologies that build 3D objects by adding layer-upon-layer of material, whether the material is plastic, metal or concrete. Using 3D printers, companies can create prototypes quickly, with less waste and cost than traditional methods. In addition, additive manufacturing is being used more and more to make finished products.

The certificate will be offered through BCS and Engineering Technology.

International Education

Study abroad by American students has more than tripled over the past two decades. During the 2010-11 academic year, 174 Pellissippi State students studied abroad, making the college the top two-year school in the U.S. in terms of the number of study abroad students.

The numbers come from the most recent Open Doors Report, published annually by the Institute of International Education in partnership with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

A key factor in Pellissippi State’s study abroad success is its robust scholarship program. Funded through the international education fee, study abroad scholarships at Pellissippi State total more than $300,000 each year.

“Our study abroad programs are designed to help students earn credits towards degrees and to develop a broader understanding of the world in which they study, live, and work,” said Wise.

“Scholarship support allows our students to travel to places they might never have imagined. Very often they come back better students and citizens and with a much better sense of who they are and what they want to do.”

Pellissippi State hosts events throughout Black History Month

Pellissippi State Community College celebrates Black History Month with a series of events throughout this month.

Black History Month, or National African American History Month, is an annual February celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of black people in U.S. history.

All Pellissippi State events for Black History Month are free and open to the public:

Feb. 4-28: “One Hundred Fifty Years … The Changing America,” a month-long exhibit in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus, 1610 E. Magnolia Ave.

Feb. 6: Healthy Pelli: a Pellissippi State health fair with workshops, screenings and displays at the Magnolia Avenue Campus.

Feb. 7: The WordPlayers perform “Lift Every Voice,” in the West Chevrolet Auditorium of the Blount County Campus, 2731 W. Lamar Alexander Pkwy., at 7 p.m. “Lift Every Voice” is a one-act presentation in drama, song and dance that tells the story of the Harlem Renaissance (1919-1929). The Knoxville-based theatre group follows up with performances on Feb. 11 in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus at 10:45 a.m. and Feb. 12 in Clayton Performing Arts Center at the Hardin Valley Campus at 12:45 p.m.

Feb. 8: The Magnolia Avenue Campus hosts Dr. Richard Grapski, an oncologist with the University of Tennessee Medical Center, for a Common Book lecture on “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.” Lacks was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells, taken without her knowledge in 1951, were discovered to be “immortal”: they can grow indefinitely. Her cells became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for development of the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization—yet for many years her family couldn’t afford health insurance.

Feb. 25: Panel discussion, “Why Does Diversity Matter?” in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus at 1 p.m.

Feb. 27: Reception for Bobby Cain and the Clinton 12 at the Goins Building College Center of the Hardin Valley Campus at 2 p.m. In 1957, Bobby Cain became the first black male to graduate from an integrated public high school in the South, and a year later, Gail Epps Upton became the first female graduate of an integrated high school in Tennessee.

For more information, call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State schedules spring-semester New Student Orientation sessions

Want to attend Pellissippi State Community College during the spring 2013 semester? Make plans now to attend a New Student Orientation session.

The sessions are required of all first-time degree-seeking freshmen. Orientation is recommended for transfer students and those who have been out of school for a while.

The sessions give new enrollees the opportunity to meet with Pellissippi State students, faculty, and staff; learn strategies for college success; explore degree, major, and transfer options; and discover campus services and resources such as financial aid. Pellissippi State encourages parents, spouses and others supportive of the student to attend as well.

A total of 10 sessions, two at each campus, are offered. Accepted students are urged to reserve their place in an orientation session as soon as possible. Dates, times and locations are as follows:

Tuesday, Dec. 4, 5:30-8:30 p.m.—Hardin Valley Campus

Thursday, Jan. 10, 5:30-8:30 p.m.—Magnolia Avenue Campus

Friday, Jan. 11, 9-11:30 a.m.—Magnolia Avenue Campus

Monday, Jan. 14, 1-3 p.m.—Blount County Campus

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.—Division Street Campus

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2-4 p.m.—Strawberry Plains Campus

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 5:30-7:30 p.m.—Blount County Campus

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 9-noon—Hardin Valley Campus

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2-5 p.m.—Division Street Campus

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 5:30-7:30 p.m.—Strawberry Plains Campus

Pellissippi State’s spring 2013 application deadline is Jan. 7. Classes begin on Jan. 17.

Visit www.pstcc.edu/admissions/orientation or call (865) 694-6400 to make your reservation. To request accommodations for a disability, email accommodations@pstcc.edu or call (865) 539-7153.

Film festival returns to Pellissippi State with screenings at all five campuses

With theater screenings at all five Knox and Blount county campuses of Pellissippi State Community College, East Tennessee film enthusiasts will have a myriad of viewing options during the upcoming seventh annual Southern Appalachian Film Festival.

Scheduled for Nov. 12-17, SOAPIFF promotes and preserves the work of independent filmmakers. It also encourages film production and film culture in Southern Appalachia.

The six-day festival is sponsored by the Tennessee Consortium for International Studies. TnCIS (www.tncis.org) is located on the Hardin Valley Campus of Pellissippi State. The Hardin Valley Campus is in Knox County, as are the Division Street, Magnolia Avenue and Strawberry Plains campuses. The Blount County Campus is the fifth of the college’s locations.

SOAPIFF features full-length and short films in the following genres: Appalachian, art/experimental, children’s, cultural minorities, documentary, environmental, foreign/international, gender/women’s, gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender, independent and young filmmakers.

As part of this year’s festival, SOAPIFF welcomes film industry veteran Adam Leipzig to Pellissippi State. Leipzig, who has served as a Disney executive and as director of National Geographic Films, has brought more than 25 movies to the screen. A reception in his honor takes place on Nov. 12 at 6:45 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium on the Hardin Valley Campus.

The director of one of the documentaries being screened also makes an appearance. Documentarian Nancy Ghertner, who directed “After I Pick the Fruit,” visits the Hardin Valley Campus on Nov. 13. The screening of her film begins at 7:55 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium.

SOAPIFF also brings to Knoxville a well-known international artist, Lori Zimmerman. Zimmerman presents and discusses current trends in fiber art on Nov. 13 at noon in the gallery of the Bagwell Center for Media and Art on the Hardin Valley Campus.

A complete schedule of SOAPIFF screenings and activities can be found at www.soapiff.com.

For more about Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus: Donate blood, possibly win tickets to Foothills Fall Festival

Medic Regional Blood Center is hosting a blood drive at Pellissippi State Community College’s Blount County Campus on Wednesday, Oct. 10, and those who donate will automatically be entered to win a pair of tickets to the Foothills Fall Festival. More important, donors will play an instrumental role in keeping the blood supply at the  levels needed to serve community members in the East Tennessee region.

One donation can help up to three people. Blood and its components are used for transfusions, as well as in the treatment of cancer patients and those with clotting disorders. There is a current need for all blood types.

The Foothills Fall Festival, a three-day event featuring concerts, juried art, exhibits and 16 acres of rides and games, is scheduled for Oct. 12-14 in Maryville. Performers this year include nationally known artists Train and Darius Rucker, along with local and regional acts.

Medic is giving a pair of reserved-seat tickets good for all three days of the performances to one blood donor who donates prior to Oct. 11.

Donors must be at least 17 years of age and weigh a minimum 110 pounds. They should not have fasted prior to arriving. In fact, Medic suggests that donors eat a meal and drink fluids approximately three hours prior to donating. Participants are asked to provide photo identification and a list of all current medications to Medic personnel at the site.

Event hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The mobile unit will be parked in the front lot of the Blount County Campus, 2731 W. Lamar Alexander Pkwy.

Additional information on the donation process can be found at www.medicblood.org.

Pellissippi State Nursing degree program receives full approval from state board

Pellissippi State Community College’s Nursing program has received full approval for its associate’s degree from the Tennessee Department of Health’s Board of Nursing.

The state board voted on the approval Aug. 22 in Nashville. The accomplishment sets the stage for Pellissippi State to pursue national accreditation for the Associate of Applied Science degree in Nursing.

“I’m very proud of our students and faculty,” said Larry Goins, Pellissippi State’s dean of Nursing. Receiving full approval, he says, is a testament to the hard work of the Nursing faculty, staff and students. It is also a reflection of the contributions of the administration and faculty beyond the program. All of them play a part in student success, says Goins.

Full approval by the board means that the program is providing a quality experience for the Nursing students, and that ultimately benefits the health of the entire community.

The state board’s action is the culmination of many successful steps that Pellissippi State has taken in implementing the program. In February, the board carried out a two-day campus visit and on-site survey. The board reviewer evaluated the program, curriculum, and degree and conducted interviews with faculty, staff, students, and nurse educators at hospitals where students engage in clinical training.

In May, Pellissippi State’s first class of Nursing students graduated. The students received a 97 percent first-time pass rate on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses. Students who pass the NCLEX-RN are licensed to practice as registered nurses in the state of Tennessee.

Pellissippi State’s associate’s degree in Nursing requires 66 credit hours of coursework, taken over four semesters. Currently, there are 110 Pellissippi State students on track to become registered nurses. Those students attend classes at the Blount County Campus or Magnolia Avenue Campus.

In addition to state approval, the associate’s degree program has received Candidacy Status from the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. The NLNAC has invited Pellissippi State’s Nursing program to complete and submit a written self-study in the multi-step process of achieving accreditation.

Once the self-study is completed, an NLNAC site visit will be conducted and a governing board review will take place to determine the program’s accreditation status.

To learn more about Pellissippi State’s Nursing program, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State, Cherokee Millwright collaborate on apprenticeship program

Pictured from left, Cherokee Millwright’s Dalton Robinson, Pellissippi State instructor Tim Napier, and Cherokee’s Steve Smith and Brandon Waggoner. Four nights a week, Cherokee Millwright apprentices train at Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus.

When Cherokee Millwright and Mechanical decided to redesign and improve its apprenticeship training program, the company turned to a trusted partner: Pellissippi State Community College’s Business and Community Services.

With home offices in Maryville and Morristown, Cherokee Millwright moves and installs equipment in factories and plants. The work is intense, takes place in a variety of industrial settings, and calls for employees with a broad range of on-the-job experience and sound technical skills.

“We provide [people] and labor to do jobs all over the country,” says Dave Bennett, CEO of Cherokee Millwright. “So we’re only as good as the people we have working with us.”

That’s where Pellissippi State’s Business and Community Services comes in. BCS collaborated with Cherokee to develop a new curriculum for the company’s four-year apprenticeship program.

The courses have been delivered at the Blount County Campus’ Manufacturing Tech Lab since January of this year. The state-of-the-art lab has 2,500 square feet dedicated to workforce training and also features the Claude F. Moon Welding Center.

A Cherokee Millwright apprentice practices welding at Pellissippi State’s Claude F. Moon Welding Center at the Blount County Campus. The college’s Business and Community Services Division worked with the East Tennessee–based company to create a new four-year apprenticeship program.

BCS offers its services to area employers who need workforce training designed specifically for their needs. In addition to serving companies, the division offers affordable short-term continuing education to individuals for professional and personal growth.

Cherokee Millwright owner Randy Massey says he is pleased with the quality of the training provided by Pellissippi State instructors and the responsive service of the BCS staff.

“If we want our training modified, it’s a phone call,” said Massey. “Or if we want something added, it’s a phone call. And they have the expertise on site to add it to our training program.”

Cherokee Millwright first created an apprenticeship program with Pellissippi State in the mid-1990s. A few years later, the company decided to take over the training of its employees. Upon reviewing the program about two years ago, however, Cherokee officials realized that their top project leaders were those who had gone through the apprenticeship classes with Pellissippi State.

Now Pellissippi State instructors once again work with Cherokee Millwright apprentices. There are four separate apprenticeship training groups, and each apprentice class attends training one night a week. The training increases in difficulty and complexity each year as employees progress in the program.

The training is critical for a company that sees itself as a one-stop shop for industrial clients and looks to recruit and retain a range of skilled employees such as millwrights, the jacks-of-all-trades among technical workers.

“We’re very specialized, and it’s not training you can get just anywhere,” said Massey.

Pellissippi State’s customized training for local industry also meets a need in post-secondary education, as Gov. Bill Haslam looks to make higher education more effective in Tennessee and meet the growing demand for more skilled and educated workers.

Learn more about Pellissippi State’s Business and Community Services at www.pstcc.edu/bcs or call (865) 539-7167.

Pellissippi State offers wide range of non-credit classes at Blount County Campus

Pellissippi State Community College has scheduled a variety of non-credit courses this fall at its Blount County Campus, and they are open for immediate registration. The fall non-credit course selection provided by Pellissippi State’s Business and Community Services Division includes the following:

“Rules of the Road for Sound Investing”—Sept. 17-Oct. 8, Mondays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.; $65. Learn the “rules of the road” to gain a better understanding of the key principles of saving and investing. Tips will be given to identify and avoid the most common investment mistakes.

“Crash Course—Not Your Typical Guitar Class for the Adult Beginner”—Oct. 2-16, Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up; $65, plus $15 materials fee payable to the instructor at the first class. Students will pick up quick, easy methods of guitar playing without having to learn lots of chords. Methods require the use of one or two fingers, making this the perfect class for those with hand or finger limitations.

“Tennessee Handgun Carry-Permit Class”—Oct. 6, Nov. 3 or Dec. 1, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; $65, plus $5 range fee payable to the instructor. Successfully completing this eight-hour course satisfies the requirement necessary for application for a state permit. About three of the hours are spent on the firing range (Location is to be announced). Students must furnish gun and ammunition.

“How to Thrive Financially in Retirement”—Oct. 9-16, Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.; $59. Designed for those who are retired or getting close to retiring, this course covers topics such as retirement investing, tax reduction, estate planning and IRA/401K strategies.

“Basic Digital Photography”—Oct. 10-Nov. 7, Wednesdays, 6:15-8:15 p.m.; $99. Participants will learn how to use a digital camera effectively. The course covers exposure, composition, lighting and color theory. Students must bring a digital SLR camera. A point-and-shoot camera may be used if it has a manual mode.

“Introduction to Using Herbs”—Nov. 8-Dec. 6 (No class Nov. 22), Thursdays, 6-9 p.m.; $65, plus required textbooks (Call for information). Susan Jane Fidler, a registered herbalist with the American Herbalist Guild, teaches students how herbs work, safe preparation for different body systems and drug-herb interaction safety tips.

All of the classes are at Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus, 2731 W. Lamar Alexander Pkwy.

Non-credit courses also are currently being offered by Pellissippi State in Knox County. For information or registration, visit www.pstcc.edu/bcs or call (865) 539-7167. The BCS website lists updated class schedules and information on new course offerings.