Pellissippi State celebrates women with ‘Love, Loss and What I Wore’

Love, Loss and What I Wore graphic

 

Pellissippi State Community College will celebrate women with the upcoming play “Love, Loss and What I Wore,” by Nora and Delia Ephron.

The play, co-produced with DuckEars Theatre Company, will be at the Clayton Performing Arts Center, 10915 Hardin Valley Road, at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 10-11 and 17-18 and 2 p.m., Feb. 12 and 19.

Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for seniors and students. Visit www.pstcc.edu/tickets or purchase tickets at the door. All of the ticket proceeds will benefit the Pellissippi State Foundation’s scholarship fund for theatre students.

“This is a simple but powerful play that showcases the stories of five women who recall seminal moments of their lives through the filter of their clothes,” said Theatre professor Charles R. Miller. “These monologues showcase the voice of women.”

This compelling dramedy discusses everything important: mothers, prom dresses, buying bras, and why women wear so much black. The play, directed by faculty member Steven McBride, will star Chevy Anz, Nancy Duckles, Kathy May Tallent, Jessie Holder Toutelotte and Deborah Webb. Additional cast and crew will include Pellissippi State students and faculty.

“Love, Loss and What I Wore,” based on the book by Ilene Beckerman, is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which features cultural activities for the community — ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures and the fine arts.

For more information, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts or call 865-694-6400.

Pellissippi State Foundation selects new executive director

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Aneisa McDonald
Aneisa McDonald

The Pellissippi State Foundation has a new executive director to lead its fundraising efforts. Aneisa McDonald, an experienced local fundraising professional, began her tenure as executive director this month.

“This feels like the greatest professional achievement of my career,” McDonald said. “I’m honored to serve. I walk through these doors every morning and see the needs of Pellissippi State’s students, and I look forward to working with our Foundation board and staff members to fulfill those needs through the gifts of our very generous donors.”

McDonald, previously the director of planned and annual giving for the Foundation, succeeds Peggy Wilson, who retired in December after 33 years at Pellissippi State. The Pellissippi State Foundation works to provide funding for student scholarships and emergency loans, facility improvements and new equipment at Pellissippi State Community College.

“When the Foundation can match a donor who wishes to give with a student who needs a scholarship or an academic program that needs new equipment, everybody wins,” McDonald said.

“Last week, the Foundation was able to give a scholarship to a student who had lost everything they owned in a fire and still retained a 4.0 GPA. That scholarship doesn’t replace what that student lost, but it can keep him on the path toward completing his dream.”

Before coming to work for the Pellissippi State Foundation in 2014, McDonald worked for Knox County Schools, the Metropolitan Drug Commission and the Arts Council of Greater Knoxville. She received her Master of Science in Education from the University of Tennessee.

She is a Tennessee Promise mentor and supports numerous organizations, including Introduction Knoxville, the Knoxville Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, East Tennessee Children’s Hospital and the Emma Walker Memorial Fund.

For more information about the Pellissippi State Foundation, visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation or call 865-694-6528.

National Science Foundation supports scholarships at Pellissippi State

The National Science Foundation has awarded Pellissippi State Community College grant funding to support a scholarship program for students studying science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

The $649,737 NSF grant will fund scholarships and support programs for students studying STEM fields at Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus. The program, Supporting College and Career Education for Student Scholarships in STEM, will provide scholarships of up to $8,500 per year to at least 24 non-traditional students with financial need. Eligible students can study transfer or career programs at Pellissippi State — the Geosciences, Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics transfer programs or the Automated Industrial Systems concentration within the Engineering Technology career program.

“There will be support for students in the form of mentoring and tutoring,” said Chris Milne, professor in Natural and Behavioral Sciences and grant lead. “The students these scholarships will help will be those who aren’t already eligible for other financial aid like Tennessee Promise or HOPE.”

The SuCCESS in STEM program involves a unique “reciprocating scholarship” system in which a student who applies for the program must pay for the first semester of school with their own funds. However, students who meet the GPA requirements for the program in that first semester will not only earn the scholarship for their remaining semesters, they will be reimbursed for their initial semester of school.

“Reciprocating scholarships offer students an incentive to succeed and to start on the right track,” Milne said.

The scholarship will pay more than the average cost of tuition at Pellissippi State, which will allow students who earn it to cover the costs of books, fees and transportation costs.

The scholarship program could be in place by fall 2017; students could begin applying to participate as early as spring 2017.

The grant also will fund support services for students enrolled in the program to encourage them to graduate and, if applicable, transfer to a four-year university. The SuCCESS in STEM program will offer students the ability to learn real-world skills through internships, mentoring and job shadowing with community partners.

Funding for this grant goes through the Pellissippi State Foundation. The Foundation works to provide student scholarships and emergency loans, as well as to improve facilities and secure new equipment.

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call 865-694-6400. For more information about the Foundation, visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation or call 865-694-6528.

Alcoa, DENSO grant funds for equipment at Pellissippi State

Alcoa and DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee have awarded Pellissippi State Community College a combined $150,000 for the purchase of new equipment for Engineering Technology students.

Alcoa’s grant of $100,000 will be used to purchase textbooks and advanced programmable logic controllers, which are computers used for industrial automation processes. The $50,000 grant from DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee will be used to purchase Elvis boards and multimeters, which are types of testing and learning equipment for electrical and electronic engineering technology.

The new equipment will be used by students enrolled in the Automated Industrial Systems and Industrial Maintenance Technology concentrations at Pellissippi State. AIS trains students to operate automated manufacturing equipment — including programmable logic controller training systems, robotics and motor training equipment — which are now the industry standard in manufacturing settings. IMT teaches students how to maintain and operate advanced manufacturing equipment.

Funding for these grants goes through the Pellissippi State Foundation. The Foundation also provides scholarships and emergency loans to students, improves facilities and secures new equipment for the college.

For more information about the Foundation, visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation or call 865-694-6528. For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call 865-694-6400.

 

Download this press release: AIS Equipment Grants

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