Tennessee Promise sessions scheduled September, October at Pellissippi State

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Pellissippi State Community College invites students entering college fall 2016 to attend one of the Tennessee Promise informational sessions the college has scheduled throughout September and October.

Tennessee Promise is a last-dollar scholarship and mentoring program that covers tuition and fees for community college students across the state. Although students who will be freshmen in 2016 won’t be eligible to receive funding until they begin school next fall, they should go ahead and apply now. The application deadline for Tennessee Promise is Nov. 2, 2015.

“It’s extremely important that students understand that they must meet this deadline to qualify to receive Tennessee Promise funding,” said Rebecca Ashford, vice president of Student Affairs at Pellissippi State. “If a student misses this deadline, there will not be another opportunity to take advantage of the Promise scholarship.”

The upcoming informational sessions will provide details about program requirements and deadlines, as well as highlight the educational offerings at Pellissippi State. The free sessions are offered at all five Pellissippi State campuses, 6-7 p.m.:

  • Sept. 14: Hardin Valley, Goins Building Auditorium
  • Sept. 16: Magnolia Avenue, Community Room
  • Sept. 22: Strawberry Plains, Lobby
  • Sept. 24: Blount County, West Chevrolet Auditorium
  • Sept. 28: Hardin Valley, Goins Building Auditorium
  • Sept. 30: Division Street, Educational Resources Center
  • Oct. 5: Hardin Valley, Goins Building Auditorium
  • Oct. 15: Open House — Hardin Valley, Goins Building Auditorium
  • Oct. 22: Blount County, West Chevrolet Auditorium
  • Oct. 26: Hardin Valley, Goins Building Auditorium

 “Tennessee Promise is an excellent opportunity for students throughout the state,” said Leigh Anne Touzeau, assistant vice president of Enrollment Services. “We hope the students in our region will take advantage of this scholarship at Pellissippi State.”

For more information, visit www.pstcc.edu/promise or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Equity and Compliance at (865) 539-7401 or accommodations@pstcc.edu.

Download this press releaseTN Promise Info Sessions 2015

This week at Pellissippi State, Aug. 18-24

Peggy Wilson, vice president of College Advancement and executive director of the Pellissippi State Foundation, has been named Rotary District 6780’s assistant governor. The position oversees Knox County’s four Rotary clubs, and Wilson will serve as an administrator to help each club become more effective. Wilson has been a member of the Rotary Club of Farragut for 10 years with 100 percent attendance. She served as the club’s president from 2010-2011.

“Hypostyle Paths,” featuring the work of faculty member Brian Jobe, will premiere in the Bagwell Center Gallery of the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road, Monday, Aug. 24. Opening reception is 4-7 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 27. Exhibit runs through Sept. 10, and gallery hours are 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Monday-Friday. “Hypostyle Paths” invites viewers to physically enter the interior space of an installation. For more information, visit pstcc.edu/arts/bagwell.

Community auditions for The Arts at Pellissippi State’s upcoming theatre season are 7:30-9:30 p.m., Sept. 1-2, in the Clayton Performing Arts Center at Pellissippi State Community College, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. Men and women of all ages are encouraged to audition. Two contrasting monologues plus a headshot and/or resume are preferred, but not required. Auditions will include cold readings from the upcoming productions “She Kills Monsters,” “Which Side Are You On: The Florence Reece Story” and “Still Life.” For more information, contact Charles R. Miller, head of Theatre productions, at cmiller@pstcc.edu

Download this press release: This Week at Pellissippi State, Aug. 18-24.

{Click each photograph to access a high-res version}

Brian Jobe Right Angle Reply
Pellissippi State Community College’s upcoming exhibit “Hypostyle Paths” will feature the work of faculty member Brian Jobe. Jobe’s previous work has included “Right Angle Reply,” pictured above.
Peggy Wilson
Peggy Wilson

Female students at Pellissippi State get career jump-start with engineering internships

Pellissippi State Community College students Kathryne Farris, left, and Gabriela Sabin, right, spent their summers interning at DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee. Pictured with Harris and Sabin is Josh Brady, DENSO section leader in the machinery and tools division.
Pellissippi State Community College students Kathryne Farris, left, and Gabriela Sabin, right, spent their summers interning at DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee. Pictured with Farris and Sabin is Josh Brady, DENSO section leader in the machinery and tools division.

Although women make up about 61 percent of enrollees in Tennessee’s community colleges, they account for only 11 percent of students who enter engineering technology programs.

This summer, Pellissippi State Community College provided three of its female students, two of whom are pursuing an Engineering Technology degree and one who plans to transfer to a four-year institution to major in engineering, with a jump-start on their careers.

Thanks to a grant from the Tennessee Space Grant Consortium, Pellissippi State was able to link all three students with engineering-related internships. The consortium, which is funded by NASA, is made up of five Tennessee Board of Regents community colleges. This is the first time that a NASA Space Grant has been awarded to Tennessee community colleges.

Kathryne Farris, who is in the Mechanical Engineering concentration of the Engineering Technology program, spent her summer working with DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee in Maryville. DENSO is one of the world’s largest automotive parts manufacturers and one of the largest employers in Blount County.

 “I’ve appreciated the inside look at the business side of jobs after graduation — which honestly has been rather terrifying to think of for me,” she said. “This has most definitely helped. My fears of the unknown have been quelled a bit, and I feel like I could enter the workforce after graduation with some extra confidence.”

That’s the goal of the internships, says Lynn Klett, an assistant professor in Engineering Technology and the Pellissippi State faculty member in charge of the grant consortium. Klett also is a mentor to the grant participants.

The Pellissippi State portion of the grant is $110,715, $45,000 of which is earmarked for scholarships to students majoring in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) programs. The award is meant to boost enrollment among women and other underrepresented groups. The funding paid for the summer internship opportunities as part of the overall scholarship package for each Pellissippi State recipient.

Farris plans to graduate in May 2016. So does scholarship recipient Gabriela Sabin, a Computer Science student. Once she earns her degree at Pellissippi State, she intends to transfer to a university, majoring in engineering. Sabin also interned at DENSO.

“I’ve been shadowing an electrical engineering co-op student who is troubleshooting and powering up a new machine,” she said. “I feel like this internship is giving me useful experience into what working as an electrical engineer would be like. I like knowing that I’ve made something that works and that people will use.”

Makayla Edwards, like Farris, a Mechanical Engineering/Engineering Technology student, will take a different path once she graduates from Pellissippi State. Instead of continuing on to a four-year school, she’ll enter the workforce directly.

“[Earning a two-year degree] is much more hands-on and applicable,” she said. “My internship was at Pellissippi State, where I worked with professor Klett in additive manufacturing. Right now, I have a huge interest in 3D printing.”

This summer, Edwards built her own 3D printer from a kit with the help of Klett and student mentors. Currently, she’s working on the design of a bicycle made from bamboo, which is considered a renewable resource because of its quick growth rate. The moving parts will be made using a 3D printer.

“I would like to think that whatever I do in the future will impact the world in a positive way,” Edwards said. “The internship has given me really useful experience. Without it, I doubt I would have had such a jump-start on 3D printing and CAD [computer-aided design].”

NASA awarded a total of $499,689 to the Tennessee Space Grant Consortium, which is headquartered at Vanderbilt University.

The award is the result of a proposal coordinated and submitted by the Pellissippi State Foundation. In total, the Pellissippi State portion of the grant will provide each of 11 students with a $4,000 scholarship.

In addition, the grant included funds to send a group from each of the community colleges to Florida to compete in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ SoutheastCon robotics event. It also will fund two grant participants to attend the 10-week Summer Robotics Program at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

For more information about this and other Foundation scholarships, visit www.pstcc.edu/foundation/scholarships or call (865) 694-6528. For information about the Tennessee Space Grant Consortium, email Klett at lbklett@pstcc.edu.

For more information about Pellissippi State and the Engineering Technology program, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Download the press releaseNASA Scholars Intern

{Click each photograph to access a high-res version}

Makayla Edwards
Makayla Edwards spent the summer interning at Pellissippi State, where she worked with a 3D printer (foreground) to make, among other things, a small plastic lizard.
Gabriela Sabin and Josh Brady
Pellissippi State student Gabriela Sabin with Josh Brady, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee.
Makayla Edwards
Makayla Edwards spent the summer interning at Pellissippi State, where she worked with a 3D printer (foreground).
Pellissippi State student Kathryne Farris with Josh Brady, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee.
Pellissippi State student Kathryne Farris with Josh Brady, DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee.

Pellissippi State awarded $50,000 by DENSO for automated manufacturing

Pellissippi State officials accept a donation of $50,000 from DENSO Wednesday, August 5. The donation will fund state-of-the-art equipment for the Engineering Technology degree program’s Automated Industrial Systems concentration. Pictured, from left, are Holly Burkett, dean of Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus; Emilie Denson, section leader of Human Resources for DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee; Melissa Smith, program manager of Community Affairs for DENSO North America Foundation; Ted Lewis, Pellissippi State's vice president of Academic Affairs; and Teri Brahams, executive director of Pellissippi State’s Business and Community Services.
Pellissippi State officials accept a donation of $50,000 from DENSO Wednesday, August 5. The donation will fund state-of-the-art equipment for the Engineering Technology degree program’s Automated Industrial Systems concentration. Pictured, from left, are Holly Burkett, dean of Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus; Emilie Denson, section leader of Human Resources for DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee; Melissa Smith, program manager of Community Affairs for DENSO North America Foundation; Ted Lewis, Pellissippi State’s vice president of Academic Affairs; and Teri Brahams, executive director of Pellissippi State’s Business and Community Services.

Automation is at the technological cutting edge of manufacturing — and Pellissippi State Community College is working with partners like DENSO Manufacturing to ensure that the college’s Automated Industrial Systems graduates are well prepared to enter the workforce.

“No question, partnerships like these are what we’re looking for in Drive to 55,” said Mike Krause, executive director of the state’s Tennessee Promise and Drive to 55 initiatives. “This initiative isn’t just about getting students in school but encouraging them to graduate and then join the workforce. That’s what it’s all about.”

The DENSO North America Foundation has awarded Pellissippi State a $50,000 grant to purchase state-of-the-art equipment for the Engineering Technology degree program’s Automated Industrial Systems concentration. The concentration prepares students to operate automated manufacturing equipment, including the programmable controller training systems, robotics and motor training equipment that are now the industry standard in manufacturing settings.

DENSO and Pellissippi State representatives gathered for a ceremonial check presentation Wednesday morning, Aug. 5, at the college’s Blount County Campus.

 “In order for students to be ready to go to work at the most advanced levels of manufacturing, we must continue to integrate newer technology into our programs,” said L. Anthony Wise Jr., Pellissippi State president. “We appreciate DENSO’s support in helping us achieve those goals.”

“Manufacturing is now high-tech. I don’t know of any manufacturing job that doesn’t include automation,” said Margaret Ann Jeffries, dean of Engineering and Media Technologies.

DENSO is a longtime supporter of Pellissippi State. Awards from the international automotive supplier during the past decade have included two grants that have helped the college build its Automated Industrial Systems concentration. The concentration was launched in 2013.

“In a global economy, DENSO is continually investing in ways to improve our competitiveness through highly skilled employees and advanced equipment,” said Mike Brackett, DENSO North America Foundation board member and senior vice president of Corporate Services at DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee. “This donation represents an investment in the future of our region, as well as in the advanced technology needed by our customers in the automotive industry.”

For more information about Automated Industrial Systems or other academic offerings at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu.

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