Mother of houseful to graduate with honors from Pellissippi State

Pellissippi State student Brandy Robinson will graduate with honors when she receives an associate’s degree in Teacher Education in May. She takes a moment to pose with her husband, Daniel, and the children. Front row (l-r): Samantha, William, Jacob, D.J. and Emma. Back row: Eli, Brandy, Daniel and Nick.

Two years ago, when Brandy Robinson made up her mind to enroll at Pellissippi State Community College, she knew she would have her work cut out for her.

Certainly, pursuing an education would require late-night studying, test-taking and plenty of focus and perseverance. But those weren’t the half of her concern: at the time, she had two children in elementary school, plus five younger ones who were at home with her every day.

Yet enroll Robinson did. And on May 4, when she walks across the stage at Pellissippi State’s Commencement ceremony, she’ll take away an associate’s degree in Teacher Education and cum laude honors for earning a 3.6 cumulative grade point average.

“I want my kids to know they can do anything they set their minds to,” said Robinson. “If I can do this—go back to school and even be on the dean’s list—then anybody can do it.”

Attending the graduation ceremony will be Robinson’s husband, Daniel, and children Nick, 12; Eli, 8; Samantha, 6; Emma, 3; and quadruplets D.J., Will, and Jake, 5. (The fourth of the quadruplets, Gabriel Noah, died in utero at 20 weeks.)

Robinson, who previously had had an unsatisfactory experience with college, says that as her children grew, so too did her desire to return to school.

Initially, she took online courses at Pellissippi State. Later, she attended classes at the Hardin Valley and Blount County campuses.

“I began classes as my younger children started into preschool and were getting close to school age,” she said. “I tried to time it so that when I finished all the online classes I could, most of my kids would be in school.

“I did most of my studying at night. I learned that sleep was way overrated and coffee was my best friend!”

Robinson recalls how she made the decision of what career she wanted to pursue.

“I didn’t want to just ‘find a job,’” she said. “I wanted a career I could start into and hopefully retire from. I love kids, and being a schoolteacher seems to be the perfect fit for me and my family, especially considering the kids’ schedules.”

Robinson took an education class her very first semester at Pellissippi State, then got real-life experience in a third-grade classroom the beginning of her second year. Of course, that wasn’t her entree into an elementary school classroom—she already had put in scores of hours as a volunteer in her own children’s classes.

“I’ve always been a firm believer that parents should be involved in their kids’ educations,” she said. “By becoming a teacher, I hope to remain active in my own children’s educations and encourage other parents to be involved in their children’s, to enrich the lives of their kids as well as their own lives. After all, learning is a lifelong process.”

This fall Robinson plans to begin working toward a bachelor’s degree in education. The children are older now, but, she says, the juggling hasn’t gotten a whole lot easier: “We are on the go year-round, since the oldest six kids rotate through football, cheerleading, basketball, baseball and softball.”

Making her journey toward a four-year degree a lot easier is a partnership between Pellissippi State and Tennessee Technological University in Cookeville. The agreement allows education students to earn a bachelor’s from TTU, yet remain at Pellissippi State’s campus to attend classes.

“I have loved being back in school,” Robinson said. “I feel like I’ve really connected with my professors and peers at Pellissippi State. It seems as though my professors really want all of their students to succeed, and one of my best friends is someone I met last semester in chemistry.”

For more information about Pellissippi State’s Teacher Education program, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu. This year’s Commencement ceremony is at the University of Tennessee’s Thompson-Boling Arena, beginning at 7 p.m.

Pellissippi State’s Nursing program graduates first class

Pellissippi State President Anthony Wise, at left, congratulates Kelly Nelson, recipient of the Outstanding Graduate Award in Nursing. Nelson is one of 29 members of the college's first Nursing class graduating May 4.

Commencement is just days away for Pellissippi State Community College’s first class of Nursing students.

Since the start of the program in fall 2010, students have balanced lectures, labs and clinical rotations each semester while preparing for the rigorous test that licenses and enables registered nurses to practice: the NCLEX-RN exam.

The students’ growth has impressed Pellissippi State’s dean of Nursing, Larry Goins.

“To see the confidence as they grow in this nursing program is just wonderful,” said Goins, a nursing educator of 20 years.

Most of the upcoming graduates are “non-traditional”—they range in age from 21-56. Theirs is a diverse group overall, says Goins. Most are parents, and one is a grandparent. Three students have bachelor’s degrees, one has a master’s, and several have other health-care certifications or licensures. Career changers are not uncommon in this group.

A trend is under way in the nursing profession: an increasing number of men are committed to working in the demanding profession. Of the 29 students in the college’s first graduating class, seven are male.

Kelly Nelson is the premier recipient of Pellissippi State’s Outstanding Graduate in Nursing Award.

Nelson, a 55-year-old retired firefighter and paramedic, started taking classes part time at the Hardin Valley Campus about four years ago. He moved to Vonore from Tucson, Ariz., after a 30-year career with the Tucson Fire Department.

A lifelong learner, Nelson already has associate’s degrees in fire science, paramedicine and liberal arts from Pima Community College. He also taught fire science as an adjunct faculty member for 15 years at Pima. He likes math and science, so he enrolled first in anatomy and physiology at Pellissippi State.

“After I took classes for probably a couple of semesters,” he said, “it just seemed like I was taking all the prerequisite courses for the Nursing program, and that was right up my alley because of my medical background in the fire department.

“It seemed like a good fit. My wife is a nurse, and I’ve got a daughter-in-law who is a nurse.”

When Pellissippi State announced the approval of the program in September 2009, Nelson decided to apply. There are nine nursing schools in the Knoxville area, but he applied only to Pellissippi State and says it has worked out great.

“I would have to say, as a group, I was concerned that I was going to be the oldest. I’m certainly one of the oldest,” he said. “The group is an older group, a lot of life experience and different careers and backgrounds.

“There are a couple of young people, but I think mostly it’s more experienced people—a diverse group, I would say, a very capable group, an enjoyable group of people.”

There are two sites for the Nursing program at Pellissippi State: the Magnolia Avenue Campus and the Blount County Campus. Both have state-of-the-art simulation laboratories. Every semester, students combine classroom lectures, lab work and clinical rotations.

The Nursing program arranged clinical rotations at 22 sites in eight counties for the first class. The variety gives students experience in a number of settings, with patients in rural and urban areas. Striking that balance prepares them to meet a range of needs and improves the students’ prospects for employment.

Pellissippi State admitted a group of 40 students for the first class. Twenty-nine are anticipated to take part in a private pinning ceremony at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 3, at the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus and in the Commencement ceremony at the University of Tennessee’s Thompson-Boling Arena the next day at 7 p.m.

“That gives us a 73 percent rate of retention, which is really good for nursing,” said Goins. “Usually it’s about 50 percent for a nursing class.”

The next class begins fall semester, and it will be larger. Goins anticipates an incoming class of 60 students.

Learn more about Pellissippi State Community College’s Nursing program at www.pstcc.edu/departments/nursing or (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State hosts open house at Strawberry Plains Campus

The public is invited by Pellissippi State Community College to attend an open house at the school’s new Strawberry Plains Campus on May 15, 4-7 p.m.

The event provides the community with an opportunity to tour the facility and learn which courses will be offered this fall. Prospective students attending the open house can get more information about dual enrollment, financial aid and academic programs. Faculty and staff will be on hand to answer questions.

The Strawberry Plains Campus is located at 7201 Strawberry Plains Pike, just off Interstate 40.

For more information about Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Opera legend Mary Costa to serve as Commencement speaker

Mary Costa
Mary Costa

Virtually every student who walks across the stage at the May 4 Pellissippi State Community College Commencement ceremony will know who Sleeping Beauty is, and many will have seen the timeless animated Disney movie.

What most of the participants won’t know is that the voice of Princess Aurora was done by Mary Costa, a legendary diva of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City who now makes her home in East Tennessee.

Costa, a native Knoxvillian, will “sing” the praises of graduates’ accomplishments as speaker at this year’s Commencement address.

During her operatic career, the world-renowned soprano performed in 44 roles on the American and European stage. She played the title role in Jules Massenet’s “Manon” at the Met. She also sang the lead of Violetta Valéry in Guiseppe Verdi’s “La Traviata” at the Royal Opera House in London.

A recipient of the Disney Legends Award, Costa has been bestowed some of the highest honors of opera, among them, the Licia Albanese-Puccini Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award and acknowledgement by the Metropolitan Opera Guild for Distinguished Verdi Performances of the 20th Century.

The Knoxville Opera Hall of Fame inductee also has served on the National Council on the Arts. Council members, who advise the chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts on agency policies and programs, are appointed by the president and approved by the Senate.

Costa now spends much of her time volunteering with schools and colleges across the country to inspire youth, especially those studying music. Last October, she was honored by Pellissippi State with a special tribute presentation of the Faculty Recital Showcase, part of the school’s annual concert series. The concert, which highlighted Costa’s volunteerism in education, was a natural fit, says Bill Brewer, the college’s Music program coordinator:

“Mary puts so much of her energy into supporting young people and encouraging them in music. Her support of our students and the Music program here at Pellissippi State has made a world of difference in the way we see ourselves. The students are ‘awestruck’ by her beauty and grace, as well as by the fact that she takes notice of their talents and achievements.”

This year, Pellissippi State will confer a record number of 1,166 associate’s degrees. Approximately 2,801 students also completed certificates during the academic year. In 2011, 992 students were awarded associate’s degrees and another 509 completed certificates.

Pellissippi State’s Commencement ceremony is scheduled for 7 p.m. at the University of Tennessee’s Thompson-Boling Arena.

For additional information regarding the ceremony, the college or the Music program, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State culinary students shine at UT’s Ready for the World Café

Pellissippi State Culinary Arts students serve as kitchen managers for UT’s Ready for the World Café luncheon series, which concludes on April 26. Pictured, l-r, are culinary students Summer Bury, Jessica Hawkins, and Candace Gilbert at the March 27 luncheon.

Candace Gilbert did Japan and Italy. Jessica Hawkins oversaw Ireland and France. Summer Bury coordinated Brazil and Persia.

No, the Pellissippi State Community College students are not involved in a study abroad program. As students in Culinary Arts at the college, all three have been involved in a series of luncheons this spring at the University of Tennessee’s Ready for the World Café.

The luncheon series, which concludes on April 26, offers the culinary students the opportunity to serve as head kitchen managers and assistant kitchen managers for luncheons inspired by cuisines from a wide variety of traditions.

In their supervisory roles, Gilbert, Hawkins and Bury have already taken their turn at executing the dining experience, managing staff, planning menus, preparing the food, generating cost analyses, marketing, serving diners and ensuring customer satisfaction.

Pictured: Summer Bury, as she prepares to serve luncheon guests.

Bury stepped into the spotlight on April 17, when she oversaw the luncheon spotlighting Persia. The Pellissippi State student, who moved to Knoxville five years ago from Washington state, says she was excited about her luncheon duties. She had previously supervised a luncheon focusing on Brazil, so many of her preparatory activities were the same for the Persia luncheon. What was different, she explains, was the challenge of gathering ingredients.

“For my research for the Persia luncheon,” she said, “I found that we couldn’t necessarily get all of the ingredients here. We had to find substitutes. Some things are the same, though, such as presentation. The food always has to be plated nicely.” Bury recently began an internship with Kroger Marketplace.

Gilbert, originally from Knoxville, says that she has been interested in cooking since the age of 4. She cooked for her family as a teen, deciding to pursue her passion as a profession when Pellissippi State began offering Culinary Arts.

Gilbert is now working as an intern with All Occasion Catering. She hopes to one day open her own catering business, preferably one that focuses on organic food and operates as a food truck. She praises the chefs who serve as instructors.

“Tyler White and John Alunni are excellent instructors,” she said. “Chef White and Chef Alunni both push you out of your comfort zone to make you the best you can be. They have been very supportive and have offered me great direction.”

Hawkins, who has worked in the restaurant industry for 13 years, enrolled at Pellissippi State for an education in hospitality management. Culinary Arts and Hospitality are two of five concentrations offered in Business Administration. She says that Tom Gaddis, coordinator of both Culinary Arts and Hospitality, saw her potential and encouraged her to attend the Culinary Arts classes.

“I am glad he did,” said Hawkins. “I love the program and am going to miss it when I graduate. We have had many great opportunities, such as working with Chef McGrady, Princess Diana’s chef, and Chef Garrett, who has his own show on PBS.”

Hawkins says she is also grateful for the employment opportunities that she attributes to Pellissippi State:

“When I started my job at Calhoun’s on the River as a banquet chef, I surprised myself with how comfortable I was and how much I know. I owe this to the Culinary Arts concentration. In this slow economy, many people have the problem of finding a job. My problem seems to be choosing which job to accept.”

The Ready for the World Café is produced through collaboration by Pellissippi State, the UT Culinary Institute and UT’s Advanced Food Production and Service Management class. The two schools began a joint venture in 2010 that offers Pellissippi State students the opportunity to earn the Associate of Applied Science degree.

The Pellissippi State students learn culinary skills in a state-of-the-art laboratory/kitchen at the Culinary Institute, located in UT’s Visitors Center, 2712 Neyland Dr. The students also take classes at Pellissippi State’s Division Street Campus, which is located two miles from the Culinary Institute.

Graduates of Pellissippi State’s two-year program are eligible to apply to the American Culinary Federation for the Certified Culinarian credential, the first step toward professional chef certification.

The April 26 luncheon features the cuisine of Germany. The event takes place noon-1 and is open to the public.

Tickets are $12, available through UT, by calling (865) 974-6645. Seating capacity is 50-60 diners.

For more information regarding Pellissippi State or the Culinary Arts concentration, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State recognizes outstanding students

More than 50 Pellissippi State students were recognized recently for outstanding achievements during the 2012 Academic Awards ceremony at Pellissippi State’s Clayton Performing Arts Center. Pictured: Pellissippi State President L. Anthony Wise Jr. congratulates Kenyatta Rogers, who was inducted into Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges.

Pellissippi State Community College recognized students for their outstanding achievements at the 2012 Academic Awards ceremony, April 9 in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus.

Students Amber Hampton and Joshua Hemphill were named to the All-USA Community College Academic Team. They were nominated by Pellissippi State President Anthony Wise in recognition of scholarly achievements.

Luis Mora, Shokrieh Rezabaksh and Lu Zhang were the recipients of the Outstanding Achievement Award–International, presented to students with international backgrounds.

Inductees into the 2011-12 Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges were Katie Adcock, Natalya Andreeva-Smith, Michael Baird, Jessie K. Crane, Alexander DeLoach, ReGina Evans-Truss, America Henry, Shandie Howell, Sarah Jett, Billi Lewellyn, Heather Lowery, Corey Miller, Luis Mora, Jean Nkurunziza, Kenyatta Rogers, Lindsay Shaw, Christina Shelley, Janell Sinclair, Ryan Sparks, Olga Vorobyeva, Kalonji Woods, Trina Yates and Karen Yearwood.

Awards of Merit were presented to students in several academic disciplines: Nathaniel West, Civil Engineering (Engineering Technology); Lyndsey Sharp, Interior Design Technology; Stephanie Bullock, Communication Graphics Technology (Media Technologies); Garrett Masters, Video Production Technology (Media Technologies); and Gatlin McPherson, Web Technology (Media Technologies).

Pictured: Lois Reynolds, interim vice president of Academic Affairs, presents the Nursing Outstanding Graduate Award to Kelly Nelson.

Outstanding Graduate Awards were given across the curriculum as well. Recipients included the following: Jesse Carmichael, Mathematics; Claudia Coleman, Behavioral Sciences; Jacqueline Davis, English; Kathryn Kelso, Natural Sciences; Sadril Mohammad, Social Sciences (Liberal Arts); and Kelly Nelson, Nursing.

Business and Computer Technology Outstanding Graduate Award recipients, with their concentrations and majors: Floyd Davis, Business (Administrative Professional Technology); Elliott Foster, Networking and Communications Systems (Computer Science and Information Technology); Sally French, Computer Accounting (Business Administration); Daniel Greene, Management (Business Administration); Elizabeth Kilbey, Marketing (Business Administration); E. Jewell Lawson, Health Care Office Administration (Administrative Professional Technology); Kyndall Leach, Culinary Arts (Business Administration); Stanley Weaver, Programming (Computer Science and Information Technology); Jesse Williams, Hospitality (Business Administration); and Karen Yearwood, Paralegal Studies.

The Engineering and Media Technologies Outstanding Graduate Awards were presented to Ryan Burgess, Interior Design Technology; Sarah Busby, Photography (Media Technologies); Chadwick Doub, Electrical Engineering (Engineering Technology); Oliver Gee, Video Production Technology (Media Technologies); Robert Kring, Civil Engineering (Engineering Technology); Matthew McNeilly, Mechanical Engineering (Engineering Technology); Michael Nagle, Web Technology (Media Technologies); and Sophie Willborn, Communication Graphics Technology (Media Technologies).

The Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs’ ACBSP Student Leadership Award was presented to Tyler Hood.

Faculty member Jonathan Lamb was selected by students to receive the Faculty of the Year Award. Lamb is an associate professor of Mathematics.

For additional information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Pellissippi State registering for fall, increases certificate choices

Fall registration is under way at Pellissippi State Community College, and the school has greatly expanded the selection of certificate programs available to students.

Pellissippi State’s certificates cover a broad range of academic disciplines and career areas—from business, computers and health science to engineering, media and education. Most certificates are “embedded” within specific degree programs, which means the classes for those certificates also count toward an associate’s degree.

“Earning a certificate offers students a benchmark along the way to a degree,” said Lois Reynolds, Pellissippi State’s interim vice president for Academic Affairs. “This gives students a sense of accomplishment, more confidence and increased motivation for continuing toward a degree.”

For non-degree-seeking students, certificate programs enable them to update or improve skills in their current field or support them in making a career change.

Pellissippi State currently offers these certificates. The ones marked with an asterisk will be available for the first time fall semester:

  • 3D Parametric Modeling SolidWorks
  • A+/Network+ Certification Preparation
  • A.A./A.S. General Education Core
  • A.A.S. General Education Core
  • Accessible Web Design and Compliance
  • Accounting Specialist
  • Architectural AutoCAD Applications
  • Basic Photography
  • Construction Business Principles*
  • Digital Imaging for Photography
  • Document Specialist
  • Early Childhood Education*
  • E-Commerce Web Design
  • Electrical Systems Technology*
  • Electronic Health Records Specialist
  • Electronics Technology
  • General Culinary Arts
  • General Hospitality
  • Industrial Automation*
  • Industrial Maintenance Technology
  • Information Systems Fundamentals
  • Interactive Web Design*
  • Medical Insurance Coding and Reimbursement
  • Mobile Web Design
  • Pre-business Transfer
  • Pre-health Science
  • Producing for Video and Media Arts*
  • Promotion Methods
  • Sound Production
  • Studio Photography*
  • Supervision
  • Surveying
  • University Computer Science Preparation
  • Video Editing
  • Videography
  • Visual Communication for Graphic Design*
  • Web Design Tools
  • Web Page Authoring

The increase in the number of certificates offered is a result of changes made by Pellissippi State to meet the goals of the Complete College Tennessee Act.

A record number of degrees and certificates were awarded to students at Pellissippi State’s Commencement ceremony in May 2011. The college awarded 962 associate’s degrees and 553 certificates. The 2012 Commencement ceremony is May 4 at the University of Tennessee’s Thompson-Boling Arena.

Registration for fall started on April 2, and classes begin in late August.

Learn more about Pellissippi State at www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400.

Register now for Pellissippi State’s May 1 golf fundraiser

On May 1, area golfers will gather at Egwani Farms to help raise funds for the Pellissippi State Foundation at the Eighth Annual Swing Big for Students Golf Tournament. Registration is open through April 27.

It’s all about the students. Amid the camaraderie, the hopes for a hole-in-one and the hushed tones during close putts, the golfers who participate in Pellissippi State Community College’s annual Swing Big for Students Golf Tournament do so knowing that they are helping area students.

The tournament, now in its eighth year, is hosted by the Pellissippi State Foundation. This year’s event takes place on May 1, and registration is open until April 27.

The Swing Big for Students Golf Tournament raises money that goes toward programs that directly impact deserving students. Funds have been used not only to provide student scholarships and emergency loans but also to improve facilities and secure new equipment.

A portion of the proceeds from the 2012 tournament will be awarded to a recipient of the Swing Big for Students Scholarship. The fund was established in 2010 for Pellissippi State students in Exercise Science or Sport Management.

Pellissippi State student Jolene Maurino, 2011 recipient of the Swing Big for Students Scholarship, and golfers at the 2010 tournament.

Jolene Maurino was the 2011 recipient.

“Returning to school after being in the workforce for several years has brought me a greater appreciation for the opportunity of education,” said Maurino. “I feel fortunate to have been selected to receive the Swing Big for Students Scholarship and offer my sincere gratitude.”

The fundraising event takes place at Egwani Farms in Rockford, and shotguns are scheduled at 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. The cost is $100 per player or $400 for a four-person team. The entry fee includes 18 holes of golf, cart, driving range, snack, lunch and prizes. In case of inclement weather on May 1, a rain date is scheduled for May 15.

A limited number of sponsorship opportunities—ranging from $150 to $5,000—are still available. Tournament is sponsored by Pilot Travel Centers.

To learn more about sponsoring or to register, contact Pat Myers, tournament director, at (865) 539-7242 or pmyers@pstcc.edu. The registration form also is available online at www.pstcc.edu/golf.

Pellissippi State concludes season of free music concerts on April 26

The musical selections have ranged from choral to instrumental, from bluegrass to holiday fare. As the 2011-12 season of Pellissippi State Community College’s annual Music Concert Series concludes on April 26, the focus will again be on choral music.

Featured during the season-ending Spring Choral Concert are performances by the student groups Concert Chorale and Variations Ensemble. The highlight of the concert is a multimedia presentation of the Variations Ensemble’s Spring Break 2012 tour in Germany. As the choir sings, the audience will experience the tour through video and still photography.

The nine-day tour included six full concerts and four abbreviated singing experiences in Berlin, Munich, Regensburg, Weimar and Wittenberg. A highlight of the tour for the Pellissippi State students was the opportunity to sing in Wittenberg’s Castle Church. The historic church is the site made famous in 1517 by Martin Luther. The German monk became a key figure in the Protestant Reformation when he nailed to the church’s doors his “Ninety-Five Theses” protesting clerical abuses.

Like all events in Pellissippi State’s music series, admission to the Spring Choral Concert is free. However, donations will be accepted at the door for the Pellissippi State Foundation on behalf of the Music Scholarship Fund. For the 2010-11 academic year, the Foundation awarded more than 100 music-related scholarships to more than 80 Pellissippi State students.

The 7 p.m. performance takes place in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus in Knoxville. Parking is convenient and free.

For additional information, call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State invites students to Middle School Mathematics Contest

All area sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade students are invited to participate in the 12th annual Pellissippi State Middle School Mathematics Contest, Friday, May 4.

Last year’s competition attracted more than 600 of the top math students from East Tennessee middle schools and also included home-school and independent competitors. The students participated in the contest at Pellissippi State Community College for the honor of being named the top middle school math student in East Tennessee.

This year’s event will again take place at the Hardin Valley Campus. The day begins with registration, 7:50-8:30 a.m. in the Clayton Performing Arts Center, and includes competitions for each grade level, as well as a party with food, music, games and inflatables.

Participation is free and more than $6,000 in prizes will be awarded to the top finishers, thanks to funding provided by Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

Students are asked to bring pencils and a calculator, except those with QWERTY keypads.

To find out more, contact Jonathan Lamb, event coordinator and an associate professor of Mathematics at Pellissippi State: jwlamb@pstcc.edu or (865) 694-6699.

To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State Community College, Knoxville, TN