GUIDE TO DEVELOPING INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS STATEMENTS

Instructional processes describe the instructional activities that provide the means through which students will achieve the stated objectives of a course. Processes must be included that develop or strengthen students' general education skills, connect course activities or material to the workplace, to subsequent coursework, or to other aspects of life, and ensure students are actively engaged in the learning process.  Instructional processes must be descriptive of the strategies and methods employed in the course. Each process should be referenced to TBR’s general education outcomes, a school-to-career transitional strategy, or an active learning strategy. 

Examples from various Pellissippi State courses are attached. TBR's general education outcomes and competencies are listed below along with sample transitional and active learning strategies.

General Education Goals, 2008-2010

I.   Communication Outcome: The goal of the Communication requirement is to enhance the effective use of the English language essential to students’ success in school and in the world by way of learning to read and listen critically and to write and speak thoughtfully, clearly, coherently, and persuasively. To achieve this outcome, students will demonstrate the ability to:

1.    Analyze and evaluate oral and/or written expression by listening and reading critically for elements that reflect an awareness of situation, audience, purpose, and diverse points of view.
2.    Distill a primary purpose into a single, compelling statement and order and develop major points in a reasonable and convincing manner based on that purpose.
3.    Develop appropriate rhetorical patterns (i.e. narration, example, process, comparison/contrast, classification, cause/effect, definition, argumentation) and other special functions (i.e., analysis or research), while demonstrating writing and/or speaking skills from process to product.
4.    Understand that the writing and/or speaking processes include procedures such as planning, organizing, composing, revising, and editing.
5.    Make written and/or oral presentations employing correct diction, syntax, usage, grammar, and mechanics.
6.    Manage and coordinate basic information gathered from multiple sources for the purposes of problem solving and decision-making.
7.    Recognize the use of evidence, analysis, and persuasive strategies, including basic distinctions among opinions, facts, and inferences.

 

 

II.    Humanities and/or Fine Arts Outcome: The goal of the Humanities and/or Fine Arts requirement is to enhance the understanding of students who, as citizens and educated members of their communities, need to know and appreciate their own human cultural heritage and its development in a historical and global context. Also, through study of Humanities and/or Fine Arts, students will develop an understanding, which they otherwise would not have, of the present as informed by the past. To achieve this outcome, students will demonstrate the ability to:

 

1.    Analyze significant primary texts and works of art, ancient, pre-modern, and modern, as forms of cultural and creative expression.
2.    Explain the ways in which humanistic and/or artistic expression throughout the ages expresses the culture and values of its time and place.
3.    Explore global/cultural diversity.
4.    Frame a comparative context through which they can critically assess the ideas, forces, and values that have created the modern world.
5.    Recognize the ways in which both change and continuity have affected human history.
6.    Practice the critical and analytical methodologies of the Humanities and/or Fine Arts.

 

III.    Social/Behavioral Sciences Outcome: The goal of the Social/Behavioral Sciences requirement is (a) to develop in the student an understanding of self and the world by examining the content and processes used by social and behavioral sciences to discover, describe, explain, and predict human behavior and social systems; (b) to enhance knowledge of social and cultural institutions and the values of this society and other societies and cultures in the world; and (c) to understand the interdependent nature of the individual, family, and society in shaping human behavior and determining quality of life. To achieve this outcome, students will demonstrate the ability to:

 

1.    Recognize, describe, and explain social institutions, structures, and processes and the complexities of a global culture and diverse society.
2.    Think critically about how individuals are influenced by political, geographic, economic, cultural, and family institutions in their own and other diverse cultures and explain how one’s own belief system may differ from others.
3.    Explore the relationship between the individual and society as it affects the personal behavior, social development and quality of life of the individual, the family and the community.
4.    Examine the impact of behavioral and social scientific research on major contemporary issues and their disciplines’ effects on individuals and society.
5.    Using the most appropriate principles, methods, and technologies, perceptively and objectively gather, analyze, and present social and behavioral science research data, draw logical conclusions, and apply those conclusions to one’s life and society.
6.    Take ethical stands based on appropriate research in the social and behavioral sciences.
7.    Analyze and communicate the values and processes that are used to formulate theories regarding the social context of individual human behavior in the social and behavioral sciences.

 

IV.    History Outcome: The goal of the History requirement is to develop in students an understanding of the present that is informed by an awareness of past heritages, including the complex and interdependent relationships between cultures and societies. To achieve this outcome, students will demonstrate the ability to:

 

1.    Analyze historical facts and interpretations.
2.    Analyze and compare political, geographic, economic, social, cultural, religious and intellectual institutions, structures, and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
3.    Recognize and articulate the diversity of human experience across a range of historical periods and the complexities of a global culture and society.
4.    Draw on historical perspective to evaluate contemporary problems/issues.
5.    Analyze the contributions of past cultures/societies to the contemporary world.

 

V.    Natural Sciences Outcome: Issues in today’s world require scientific information and a scientific approach to informed decision making. Therefore, the goal of the Natural Science requirement is to guide students toward becoming scientifically literate. This scientific understanding gained in these courses enhances students’ ability to define and solve problems, reason with an open mind, think critically and creatively, suspend judgment, and make decisions that may have local or global significance. To achieve this outcome, students will demonstrate the ability to:

 

1.    Conduct an experiment, collect and analyze data, and interpret results in a laboratory setting.
2.    Analyze, evaluate and test a scientific hypothesis.
3.    Use basic scientific language and processes, and be able to distinguish between scientific and non-scientific explanations.
4.    Identify unifying principles and repeatable patterns in nature, the values of natural diversity, and apply them to problems or issues of a scientific nature.
5.    Analyze and discuss the impact of scientific discovery on human thought and behavior.

 

VI.    Mathematics Outcome: To expand students’ understanding of mathematics beyond the entry level requirements for college and to extend their knowledge of mathematics through relevant mathematical modeling with applications, problem solving, critical thinking skills, and the use of appropriate technologies. To achieve this outcome, students will demonstrate the ability to:

 

1.    Build on  (not replicate) the competencies gained through the study of two years of high school algebra and one year of high school geometry.
2.    Use mathematics to solve problems and determine if the solutions are reasonable.
3.    Use mathematics to model real world behaviors and apply mathematical concepts to the solution of real-life problems.
4.    Make meaningful connections between mathematics and other disciplines.
5.    Use technology for mathematical reasoning and problem solving.
6.    Apply mathematical and/or basic statistical reasoning to analyze data and graphs.

 

VII.  Technological Literacy Outcome: The goal of the Technological Literacy requirement is to develop in the student an understanding of the role of technology in society and the skills necessary to adapt to changing technology. Students will also learn to gather and disseminate current and historical information in their field of specialization to aid them in making informed decisions. To achieve this outcome, students will demonstrate the ability to:

 

1.    Perform routine personal computer operations.
2.    Communicate effectively using the Internet.
3.    Identify information resources, facilities, and personnel appropriate to their needs.
4.    Access information using manual and electronic systems.
5.    Evaluate retrieved information to determine its relevance to intended use.
6.    Use retrieved information in making decisions

 

Transitional Strategies - The activities list below is NOT a list from which strategies must be selected. It is presented only to suggest ideas for classroom activities that could assist students in seeing the relevance of what they are learning in class to their professional careers, to subsequent coursework, or to other aspects of their lives. Transitional strategies include:
 

 

Career exploration research

Job shadowing

Business Tours

Volunteer activities

Participation in relevant out-of-class events 

Simulations

Guest lectures from the community

Internships

Interviews with professionals/political, social leaders

Mentoring

Active Learning Strategies - An active learning strategy might be defined as an activity that requires students to DO something...the instructor can be sure that each student did it. A passive learner receives information; an active learner uses information to accomplish a task. Active learning strategies are not limited to group work, although organized group activities are an effective way to involve students in the learning process. Active learning strategies include:
 

 

Group projects/assignments

Role playing

Participation in relevant out-of-class events

Games

Student-generated course material

Brainstorming sessions

Round-Robin Problem Solving

Peer critiques

Student-led discussions

Structured in-class debates

 


EXAMPLE INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS STATEMENTS

 

ENGL 1010 English Composition I

Students will

1.     Collaborate in teams for peer review of drafts to analyze audience and message, to develop and organize ideas, and to evaluate drafts as to effectiveness and clarity. Communication Outcome, Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy

2.     Analyze and write sample business letters using word processing software. Communication Outcome, Technological Literacy Outcome, Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy

3.     Listen to guest speakers from various businesses to discover demands of written communication in the work world. Transitional Strategy

4.     Read assigned essays and participate in class discussion. Communication Outcome, Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy

5.     Write analytical, expository essays using word processing software. Communication Outcome, Technological Literacy Outcome, Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy

6.     Develop research skills using the Internet and library resources to find information pertinent to essays requiring documentation. Communication Outcome, Technological Literacy Outcome, Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy

7.     Develop oral presentation skills to present individual and group information from research, using tables, graphs, and/or charts to help draw conclusions from the data. Communication Outcome, Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy

8.     Internalize the work ethic by regularly attending class, being punctual, being dependable, cooperating with the teacher and other classmates, contributing to class discussion and projects, and acting in a professional manner while in class. Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy



SOC 1020 Social Problems and Social Change

Students will

1.     Research and write a report on a specific social problem. Communication Outcome, Social/Behavioral Sciences Outcome, Technological Literacy Outcome

2.     Research the internet to find current information on social problems. Technological Literacy Outcome

3.     Use oral presentation skills to present findings from research. Communication Outcome, Technological Literacy Outcome

4.     Use teamwork to debate social problems. Social/Behavioral Sciences Outcome, Active Learning Strategy

5.     Participate as a volunteer with a local agency to learn more about career opportunities and about various dimensions of social problems. Social/Behavioral Sciences Outcome, Transitional StrategyActive Learning Strategy

6.     Practice elements of the work ethic, such as punctuality, professionalism, dependability, cooperation, and contribution.  Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy



BIOL 1120 General Biology II

Students will

1.     Locate and evaluate related scientific information in the ERC and on the World Wide Web. Technological Literacy Outcome

2.     Use related equipment and tools for making biological measurements and observations. Natural Sciences Outcome, Technological Literacy Outcome

3.     Collect data, generate graphs and tables of the collected data, summarize the data and draw conclusions from the data. Natural Sciences Outcome, Technological Literacy Outcome

4.     Read and critique scientific writings. Communication Outcome

5.     Develop a vocabulary that allows them to communicate more effectively with their health care providers. Communication Outcome, Transitional Strategy

6.     Participate in laboratory exercises and lecture activities which develop teamwork, problem solving, and data analysis. Natural Sciences Outcome, Active Learning Strategy

7.     Select a learning experience that promotes independent thinking and required sustained effort and time such as a research project, job shadowing, community service project, interviews or field trip. Active Learning Strategy



DSPM 0890 Developmental Mathematics

Students will

1.     Use graphing calculators and/or computer software. Mathematics Outcome, Technological Literacy Outcome

2.     Engage in collaborative activities, e.g., modeling projects, teamwork, presentations, and/or other activities involving linear, quadratic, and/or radical functions. Mathematics Outcome, Active Learning Strategy, Transitional Strategy

3.     Use multiple approaches - physical, numerical, graphical, symbolic, and verbal - to solve polynomial, rational, and radical equations. Mathematics Outcome

4.     Actively engage in a quadratic modeling project that simulates projectile flight and connects 0890 to entry-level college mathematics courses as well as physical science courses. Mathematics Outcome, Natural Sciences Outcome, Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy



ART 1730 Western Art II

Students will

1.     Develop written summaries of visual art exhibits that emphasize the cultural implications of the works observed. Communication Outcome, Humanities/Fine Arts Outcome, Active Learning Strategy

2.     Participate in interactive discovery exercises that focus on the power and limitations of cultural conditioning. Humanities/Fine Arts Outcome, Transitional Strategy, Active Learning Strategy

3.     Evaluate the influence of the visual arts in defining societal issues by identifying and discussing contemporary and 14th-17th century Western European images that communicate various positions on significant social and political concerns. Humanities/Fine Arts Outcome, Active Learning Strategy


Posted:  February 6, 2009