Category Archives: The Arts

Pellissippi State: Honors students featured in student music recital

Pellissippi State Community College’s Student Honors Recital will feature the musical stylings of 18 students.

The recital is at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 6, in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the college’s Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The community is invited.

The event is free, but donations will be accepted at the door for the Pellissippi State Foundation on behalf of the Music Scholarship Fund.

“Eighteen of our best student performers will offer up a wide variety of musical offerings, ranging from classical to Broadway to jazz and blues,” said Bill Brewer, Music program coordinator and associate professor.

“Students are chosen through an audition process upon recommendation of their instructors at Pellissippi State. Each student will perform a single selection at this showcase recital event.”

The Student Honors Recital is the latest in a string of performances during Pellissippi State’s yearlong Music Concert Series. The series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

All piano performances and accompaniments will be performed on Steinways, in keeping with Pellissippi State’s status as an All Steinway School.

For additional information about the Pellissippi State Music Concert Series or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Abolitionist John Brown topic of Feb. 27 talk

Joy-IngramJoy Ingram, an associate history professor at Pellissippi State Community College, delivers a presentation about white Civil War abolitionist John Brown Thursday, Feb. 27.

Part of the college’s Faculty Lecture Series, Ingram’s presentation, “John Brown: Maniacal Egoist or Moral Crusader?” begins at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

The event is free. The community is invited.

“The South was used to slave rebellions,” said Ingram, “but Brown’s uprising was the first time a person from the North had come to the South and committed acts of violence to try to free the slaves. Some historians say he sparked the Civil War.

“He’s been labeled crazy, a martyr, a religious zealot, a hero. I’m not going to try to put a label on him—I’ll leave that to the audience. But I will try to see what sets him apart from other abolitionists, what made him unique and what the end result of his actions was.”

Brown believed armed insurrection was the only way to end slavery in America. He and his followers instigated a number of conflicts in the South, culminating in an unsuccessful raid that he led on a federal armory in Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Brown was captured there and charged with treason, then hanged.

“Brown did not accomplish his plan to end slavery before his death,” said Ingram, “but his ideals lived on. The Harpers Ferry raid in 1859 escalated tension that eventually led to Southern secession and the Civil War.” The war began in 1861 and ended in 1865.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “John Brown” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State presents student theatre production ‘Freedom Circus’

Pellissippi State Community College students will be the stars—and writers and directors—of the upcoming theatre production “Freedom Circus,” Feb. 21-23.

“Freedom Circus” premieres at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 21, in Pellissippi State’s Clayton Performing Arts Center, on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. Additional performances are 7:30 p.m., Feb. 22, and 2 p.m., Feb. 23.

“Expect the funny, weird, shocking and poignant all in one sitting, in this collection of short plays written and directed by, and starring, students from Pellissippi State’s Theatre program,” said Charles R. Miller, Theatre program coordinator and professor.

Admission is free, but donations are accepted at the door. All proceeds go to the Pellissippi State Foundation to support the Theatre program and scholarships. Ample free parking is available.

“Freedom Circus” is one of the events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

For more information about The Arts at Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State hosts high school students in Winter Choral Concert

Pellissippi State Community College’s Winter Choral Concert features performances from two high schools, Hardin Valley Academy and Lenoir City High School.

The Winter Choral Concert is at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25, in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road.

“We invite different high school choirs to this concert each year to give them an opportunity to be on campus, to meet our students and to learn about our Music program offerings,” said Bill Brewer, Music program coordinator and associate professor.

The event is free and the community is invited. Donations will be accepted at the door for the Pellissippi State Foundation on behalf of the Music Scholarship Fund.

“The high school choirs will perform along with Pellissippi State’s own Concert Chorale and Variations groups,” said Brewer, “for an evening of fine choral music covering a wide range of styles and tastes.”

The Concert Chorale and Variations groups comprise a cross-section of students from a variety of majors. The Variations Ensemble is preparing for a study abroad and concert opportunity overseas in May 2014, in collaboration with the Tennessee Consortium for International Studies.

The Winter Choral Concert is the latest in a string of performances during Pellissippi State’s yearlong Music Concert Series. The series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts. All piano performances and accompaniments are performed on Steinways, in keeping with Pellissippi State’s status as an All-Steinway School.

For additional information about the Pellissippi State Music Concert Series or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources and Affirmative Action at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State campuses host free Black History Month events

Pellissippi State Community College is celebrating Black History Month with numerous events at its five campuses throughout February. Activities are free and the community is invited.

The Magnolia Avenue Campus starts the month-long activities with “Healthy Pelli: Campus Health Fair,” Wednesday, Feb. 5. Each Friday in February, the site hosts an African Jazz Cafe in the Lobby.

The Division Street Campus offers two films in February: Disney’s “Ruby Bridges” on the 11th and “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” on the 20th. Both are at 12:15 p.m. in the Student Lounge.

The Magnolia Avenue Campus hosts a “History of African-American Music: Freedom Songs, Blues and Jazz” 10:45 a.m.-Noon Wednesday, Feb. 12, in the Community Room. The presentation features local jazz artist Kelle Jolly.

The Blount County Campus presents the documentary “The Underground Railroad” Tuesday, Feb. 18, in the Educational Resources Center.

At the Hardin Valley Campus, Feb. 21 brings “A Celebration of African-American Art, Music and Literature.” The event is in the Goins Building College Center, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. It features an art display, performance by the Vine Middle School African Dancers and Drummers, poetry reading by Oak Ridge poet Rose Weaver, and “Taste of Soul Food.”

Also at the Hardin Valley site, Feb. 27 the community is invited to a Faculty Lecture Series presentation: “John Brown: Maniacal Egotist or Moral Crusader?” by Joy Ingram, an associate professor. The talk is at 2 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium.

Throughout the month, African-American history exhibits will be on display in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus, the Lobby of the Strawberry Plains Campus, the Student Lounge of the Division Street Campus, and the Educational Resources centers of the Blount County and Hardin Valley campuses.

The theme of the display at the Magnolia Avenue Campus is “All About That Jazz”; Division Street, “Embrace African-American Heritage Board of Fame”; and Strawberry Plains, “African-Americans of Influence.”

Other ongoing events include African tea and coffee tastings:

  • Hardin Valley, Goins Building Rotunda, 8:30-10 a.m. Wednesdays
  • Division Street, Student Lounge, 9-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays
  • Strawberry Plains, Lobby, 9-10:30 a.m. Mondays

For more information about Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State: Poet Dunbar topic of Feb. 6 Faculty Lecture Series talk

portrait of a male in black hat and gray sweatshirtThe enduring poetry of African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar will be the topic of two Faculty Lecture Series presentations at Pellissippi State Community College in February.

Robert Boyd presents “A Salute to Dunbar,” reading selections from “The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar,” on Thursday, Feb. 6, and Thursday, Feb. 20.

“Dunbar was a ‘griot’ [an African tribal storyteller] who told his tales in verse,” said Boyd, an associate professor of English. “Words, rhythms, rhymes and voices became verse, verse that flowed from his imagination and his life on to those of us who read.”

The Feb. 6 presentation is at 12:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium of the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. The Feb. 20 presentation takes place at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Room of the Magnolia Avenue Campus, 1610 E. Magnolia Ave.

Both events are free. The community is invited.

Boyd’s presentations will include a discussion of Dunbar’s life and selected readings from his works.

Dunbar was an African-American poet, novelist and playwright of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Born in Ohio to parents who had been slaves in Kentucky, he was one of the first black writers to establish a national reputation.

“He wanted to be known for his more traditional poetry, but most of his better-known works are written in dialect,” Boyd said.

The Faculty Lecture Series is part of The Arts at Pellissippi State, which brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

To learn more about “A Salute to Dunbar” or The Arts at Pellissippi State, call (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Sculptor Padrón brings ‘Journeyman’ exhibit to Pellissippi State

Raymond Padrón, "Into the Wild," sculpture
Raymond Padrón, “Into the Wild,” sculpture

Sculptor Raymond Padrón brings a one-man show of his far-ranging and eclectic pieces to Pellissippi State Community College in February, part of The Arts at Pellissippi State.

“Journeyman,” featuring the artist many may know from his public art installations in Chattanooga, exhibits at the Bagwell Center for Media and Art gallery Feb. 10-28, with an opening reception 4-6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 10.

Some of the pieces Padrón will display were done specifically for this exhibit. According to Brian Jobe, a Liberal Arts adjunct faculty member, the sculptor uses a variety of techniques for his work, including casting and woodworking.

Raymond-Padron_head-shotThe Bagwell Gallery is located at Pellissippi State’s Hardin Valley Campus. Both the opening reception and the exhibit are free and open to the community. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Ample parking is available on campus.

“Journeyman” is one of the events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

For more information about The Arts at Pellissippi State, contact Pellissippi State at (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.

Pellissippi State puts out casting call for ‘Unnecessary Farce’

Comedic actors and actresses: Try out your talents at Pellissippi State Community College. Auditions get under way at the end of this month for the play “Unnecessary Farce.”

Auditions are open to everyone. They take place 7-9 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, Jan. 27-28, in Room 156 of the Alexander Building on the college’s Hardin Valley Campus.

“Unnecessary Farce” is the tale of a police sting gone awry after a bumbling mayor, a pair of lusty civil servants and a Scottish hit man are thrown together. This is a fast-paced, physical comedy that will require performers to have perfect timing and boundless energy.

Rehearsals will be 7-10:30 p.m. Sundays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Pellissippi State presents “Unnecessary Farce” at 7:30 p.m., April 4, 5, and 11 and at 2 p.m., April 6 and 13. Tickets will be available at www.pstcc.edu/tickets.

“Unnecessary Farce” is one of the events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts series, The Arts at Pellissippi State. The series brings to the community cultural activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

For more information about The Arts at Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts or call (865) 694-6400.

The Arts at Pellissippi State: Spring events range from art exhibits to theatre productions

More chances to enjoy dance, song, culture, art and theatre abound this spring as the 2013-2014 Arts at Pellissippi State, a series of events celebrating arts and culture, continues. Many of the presentations are free, and all are open to the public.

Participation in the arts does not mean just creation or performance by the artists. It can mean something a bit different to each individual who studies an exhibit, listens to a vocalist or discusses a film with friends.

Pellissippi State Community College invites members of the community to find their own ways to participate in The Arts at Pellissippi State’s array of activities.

Kicking off the new year is the “Art Histories” exhibit, featuring the works of S. L. Dickey and Tom Wegrzynowski. The exhibit runs Jan. 16-Feb. 6 at the gallery in the Bagwell Center on Pellissippi State’s Hardin Valley Campus. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Monday-Friday.

Other visual arts events include an exhibit of the art of Raymond Padrón in February, the Pellissippi State Frame-by-Frame Student Media Competition in March and the annual Student Art Show in April.

In recognition of Black History Month, Pellissippi State presents the Celebration of African-American Art, Music and Literature, Feb. 28, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The event takes place in the Goins Building College Center on the Hardin Valley Campus.

The college hosts the Seventh Annual Festival of Cultures 4:30-8:30 p.m., April 11, also in the Goins Building. This multicultural celebration allows attendees to sample foods and dance to music from a diverse selection of nations.

Theatre productions, both in the Clayton Performing Arts Center on the Hardin Valley Campus, include “Freedom Circus” Feb. 21-23 and “Unnecessary Farce” April 4-6 and 11-13. Admission to “Freedom Circus” is free. Tickets to “Unnecessary Farce” are available at www.pstcc.edu/tickets.

Musical performances include the Winter Choral Concert on Feb. 25, the Student Honors Recital on March 6, the popular Jazz and Bluegrass Concert on March 27, the Instrumental Concert on April 24, and the Spring Choral Concert on May 1.

Rounding out the spring Arts at Pellissippi State calendar are three Faculty Lecture Series events—two in February and one in March—presented by Pellissippi State faculty members Robert Boyd, Joy Ingram and John May. Lecture topics include poet Laurence Dunbar, abolitionist John Brown and indie wrestling.

For more information about a particular event in The Arts at Pellissippi State, or for a full listing of the spring events, dates and times, visit www.pstcc.edu/arts.

Unique collaboration on ‘Art Histories’ comes to Pellissippi State

painting of knight with bear head on a horse with football players in front
Tom Wegrzynowski’s “Lucky’s Triumphant Entry Into Rome.”

The Arts at Pellissippi State kicks off the new year with a special art exhibit, “Art Histories,” featuring the work of S. L. Dickey and Tom Wegrzynowski, in January and February.

“Art Histories” is on exhibit at the Bagwell Gallery Jan. 16-Feb. 6, with an opening reception set for 4-6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The artists are showing together for the first time for this unique exhibit at Pellissippi State Community College. Dickey, chair of the department of art and design at the Mississippi University for Women, is known for creating dimensional screenprints and for “The Piedmont Sideshow,” performance art that explores perceived conflict.

Wegrzynowski is a painter and instructor at the University of Alabama. His work deals with the nature of myth and symbolism as a foundation for identity.

“S. L. Dickey’s work is more informed by a pop history, and Tom Wegrzynowski’s work, while it does come from history, has an alternative narrative to it,” said Herb Rieth. Rieth is the curator of the exhibit, as well as an assistant professor of Liberal Arts at Pellissippi State.

painting of a man with black hair, black suit, and red background.
S.L. Dickey’s “The Match King”

“They’re very complementary styles. They each take a historical narrative and individualize it through their work.”

The Bagwell Gallery is located in the Bagwell Building on Pellissippi State’s Hardin Valley Campus. The “Art Histories” exhibit and reception are free, and the community is invited to enjoy both. Plenty of parking is available.

“Art Histories” is one of the many events that make up Pellissippi State’s arts and cultural series, “The Arts at Pellissippi State.” The series brings to the community activities ranging from music and theatre to international celebrations, lectures, and the fine arts.

For more information about The Arts at Pellissippi State, contact Pellissippi State at (865) 694-6400 or visit www.pstcc.edu/arts. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.