Author, special-needs advocate headlines ‘Evening of Glamour’ at Pellissippi State

cover of a bookKnoxville native Keva Horry, an author and special-needs advocate, is featured at “An Evening of Glamour” at Pellissippi State Community College Thursday, Oct. 10.

Horry is the mother of Ashlyn Horry, who died in 2011, with former husband and seven-time NBA champion Robert Horry. She speaks about her daughter’s special needs and short life and of the book Horry wrote about that experience, “Glamorous Sacrifice: Life in the Shadow of Championships,” released earlier this year.

“Keva Horry will be speaking on her life as the mom of a special-needs child, the joys and challenges it brings, and of living in the shadow and spotlight of the NBA,” said Joy Ingram, associate professor of Liberal Arts. “She also will share some of the lessons her daughter taught her, as well as lessons we all can learn from Ashlyn’s beautiful but short life.

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month, and by bringing Keva in to speak about her experiences, we hope to bring awareness to disabilities in general and to Ashlyn Horry’s legacy.”

African-American female wearing red and leaning on her hands“An Evening of Glamour” begins with a book signing by Keva Horry, 5-6 p.m. in the Rotunda of the Goins Building on Pellissippi State’s Hardin Valley Campus. Copies of “Glamorous Sacrifice” will be available for purchase. Horry’s presentation will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the Goins Building Auditorium, with a question-and-answer session to follow.

“An Evening of Glamour” is free and open to the public; seating is limited. Parking also is free and is available in any lot not requiring a staff parking pass.

Ashlyn Horry was born with a rare chromosome abnormality known as 1p36 deletion syndrome. The syndrome was not identified until she was 14 years old. Despite respiratory issues, seizures, and other physical and cognitive disabilities, Ashlyn lived to age 17.

Three years before Ashlyn died, the Horrys founded the Ashlyn Horry Foundation in her honor to serve as a source of information and hope to the families of those suffering with the same disease. Currently, there is no specific treatment or cure for the 1p36 deletion syndrome.

For more information about “An Evening of Glamour,” visit www.pstcc.edu or call (865) 694-6400. To request accommodations for a disability, contact the executive director of Human Resources at (865) 694-6607 or humanresources@pstcc.edu.